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Top 10 "Pot of" Cards in Yu-Gi-Oh

Jeremy enjoys dueling in between working as a chemical analyst and campus building manager.

What Are Yu-Gi-Oh's "Pot of" Cards?

Kicked off by the infamous Pot of Greed spell (which we for sure definitely won't encounter today) and continued by the long-forbidden Morphing Jar monster, Konami has developed an unusual fascination with overpowered ceramics. Forget Blue-Eyes White Dragon or Dark Magician; all you need to win duels are a few pottery classes.

But in all seriousness, a surprising number of players aren't aware of the copious "Pot of" units, most of which help you gain card advantage by drawing cards in different ways and many of which adorn the game's banned list. But with several different earthenware sorceries to choose from, which porcelain pottery packs the most powerful punch?

These are the ten best "Pot of" cards in Yu-Gi-Oh!

  • Pot of Duality
  • Shard of Greed
  • Pot of Avarice
  • Pot of Acquisitiveness
  • Pot of The Forbidden
  • Pot of Dichotomy
  • Pot of Riches
  • Pot of Greed
  • Pot of Desires
  • Pot of Extravagance
Pot of Duality

Pot of Duality

9. Pot of Duality

Type: Spell

Pot of Duality? More like Pot of Duel-ality am I right? Lame puns aside, Duality works well in decks that lean towards normal summoning. Activating it lets you excavate (look at) the top three cards of your deck and add one to your hand, shuffling the rest back in.

You're spending one card to gain one, with no overall hand size change, but being able to pick what you want from three options helps you riffle through your assortment to find needed units. However, be aware that you can't special summon the turn you activate Duality, a hefty trade-off in most builds but less noticeable in normal summoning archetypes like the Monarch or Yosenju clans.

Pot of Acquisitiveness

Pot of Acquisitiveness

8. Pot of Acquisitiveness

Type: Spell

Here's a neat one. Pot of Acquisitiveness targets any three banished monsters, shuffles them into their respective decks, then lets you draw one card. Your overall hand size stays the same, but Acquisitiveness grants the rare trait of recycling your exiled titans back into your build, countering removal forces like Macro Cosmos or Dark Magician of Chaos and hopefully letting you resummon your allies in future turns.

Additionally, unlike its brethren, Acquisitiveness activates at quick-play speed, letting you trigger it on any phase of either player's turn. Set it face-down to have your opponent waste a spell removal card trying to eradicate it, only to activate Acquisitiveness in response and use it before it crumbles. Sorry pal, you should have known better than to mess with Pot.

Pot of The Forbidden

Pot of The Forbidden

7. Pot of The Forbidden

Type: Spe—oh wait, it's a monster

Ironically, Pot of the Forbidden is perfectly legal in competitive play. Setting this hefty earthenware face-down takes two tributes, but the effort will pay off when Forbidden is flipped (either by manually shifting its battle position or when being attacked by an enemy). Not only does Forbidden wield a decent 2000 ATK and excellent 3000 DEF, but it also lets you select and use one of four great abilities when revealed. You can:

  • Draw two cards
  • Return all spells and traps on the field to the hand
  • Destroy all monsters your opponent controls
  • Look at your opponent's hand and shuffle one card from it into their deck

These are all superb abilities. You're either getting a free "Pot of Greed" with two draws, a free "Raigeki" to wipe out opposing monsters, a free "Giant Trunade" by returning all spells/traps to the hand, or a free "Confiscation" by looking at your opponent's hand and removing a card from it. A versatile card for any build with tributes to spare, you can easily catch your adversaries off-guard with some forbidden pot. Also note that it bears the rare level of 9, letting you use it as material for powerful rank 9 xyz summons.

Pot of Dichotomy

Pot of Dichotomy

6 Pot of Dichotomy

Type: Spell

Savvy players like myself know what the word Dichotomy means without having to Google it. I definitely didn't do that. Anyway, this card shuffles three monsters with different types from your graveyard into your deck, then draws two cards.

Not only do you need fewer monsters for this ability (albeit with the type errata), Dichotomy is legal and available in any tournament! That said, you can't conduct your battle phase the turn you play Dichotomy, so wait until card advantage takes priority over offense to unleash your two-faced magic.

Pot of Riches

Pot of Riches

5. Pot of Riches

Type: Spell

Pot of Riches excels by offering more locations to pull from and fewer restrictions than its other legal counterparts. You shuffle three pendulum monsters that are either in your graveyard or face-up in your extra deck into your deck, then draw two cards. Not only does this add to your hand size, but it also helps get pendulum monsters out of the graveyard (where you don't want them since they can't be resummoned) and extra deck (where you kinda don't want them since resummoning uses your scarce extra deck monster zones).

Yes, there's a limitation: you cannot special summon, except for pendulum summons, the turn you activate Riches, and you can only play one per turn. This is a surprisingly generous forfeit that still lets you access your pendulum special summoning, something you're obviously shooting for in a deck that encompasses pendulum monsters. "Oh no, my own card has temporarily disabled everything except my primary summoning method!" Bummer, man.

A staple of my pendulum builds to save my extra zones, Pot of Riches also won't break the bank, costing less than one dollar!

Pot of Avarice

Pot of Avarice

4. Pot of Avarice

Type: Spell

Pot of Avarice (the best pots are always sinful) lets you shuffle five of your monsters in the graveyard back into your deck, then draw two cards. Not only does this increase your hand size, but it also refills your deck and guards against a mill loss.

Avarice functions especially well when returning extra deck monsters to your extra deck (duh), allowing them to be resummoned once more without having to draw them. Avaraice is limited as of this writing, only allowing one copy per deck; use cards like "Future Fusion" and "Dragon Shrine" to rapidly stockpile your graveyard for its effect.

Pot of Desires

Pot of Desires

3. Pot of Desires

Type: Spell

Conspire to acquire Pot of Desires to make opponents perspire as you tire them into a dire mire. It simply banishes ten cards from the top of your deck face-down, then lets you draw two cards. No required graveyard-fill or other conditions; this is an easy and fast draw engine to grant you hand advantage early on.

You just have to be careful not to let your deck run too thin, but unless you're facing a mill deck, odds are good the duel will end long before your deck list empties. Crafty players can even turn the exiled cards into an advantage by using them to fuel the power of spells like Pot of Acquisitiveness. Most themes use 40 main deck cards, but you can go up to 60, giving more of a safety net when running multiple Desires.

Pot of Greed

Pot of Greed

2. Pot of Greed

Type: Spell

What? How is Pot of Greed not number one? Well, yea, it might be the best card in the game (rivaled only by Graceful Charity and Harpie's Feather Duster), but it's no bueno in any sort of official play thanks to its massively overpowered effect: you simply draw two cards.

Two cards for one grants with no trade-offs or needed criteria helps you access the rest of your deck at unholy speeds. Before this guy was banned, every single deck contained three copies, and I'm glad Konami soon realized they need to keep their ceramics in check.

Pot of Extravagance

Pot of Extravagance

1. Pot of Extravagance

Type: Spell

You can only use Extravagance at the start of your first main phase, and doing so prevents you from drawing for the rest of the turn after it resolves. But to compensate, you banish either three or six (your choice) random cards from your extra deck face-down, drawing a card for every three you exiled.

So, you can banish three to simply replace Extravagance in hand, but if you choose six, you'll gain the classic two-for-one Greed bonus, albeit at the price of a diminished extra deck. Use with themes that don't heavily rely on extra cards, like Monarch, and run two or three copies of ace units in case one gets banished.

Future of Pottery in Yu-Gi-Oh

As we all know, ceramics are no laughing matter, and whenever you encounter one in Yu-Gi-Oh, you need to stay vigilant lest they grant your opponent hand advantage before you can ask, "How did a pot grow a mustache anyway?". Versatile and bearing several different forms to assist just about any type of deck, use these fierce containers to box your opponent into a corner.

Still, with many more mighty materials to master (we haven't even tackled the Jar series yet), we'll undoubtedly return to the kiln to unearth more intimidating clay contraptions in the future. But for now, as we eagerly await further hilariously-strong Konami kettles, vote for your favorite pot and I'll see you at our next Yu-Gi-Oh countdown!

Questions & Answers

Question: For Pot of the Forbidden, am I able to choose an effect at each turn, or can I only use one when it’s flipped?

Answer: You only get one, and only when flipped; otherwise, it would have a "once per turn" wording. That said, if you turn Forbidden back face-down with other effects, then flip it, you again get to utilize one of its abilities.

Question: Why is Desires the number one Yu-Gi-Oh playing care? Pot of Greed is objectively better.

Answer: Sure, but Greed is banned and will probably stay that way. Thus, in terms of official play, it's practically worthless since you can never use it.

© 2018 Jeremy Gill