Top 10 Cards You Need for Your "Bad Reaction to Simochi" Yu-Gi-Oh Deck - HobbyLark - Games and Hobbies
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Top 10 Cards You Need for Your "Bad Reaction to Simochi" Yu-Gi-Oh Deck

Jeremy enjoys dueling in between working as a chemical analyst and campus building manager.

Bad Reaction to Simochi

Bad Reaction to Simochi

What Is Bad Reaction to Simochi?

Before we discuss how to best support the trap "Bad Reaction to Simochi," let's examine the card itself. An iconic card powerful enough to have entire decks (known as Anti-Cure builds) based around its usage, Simochi reverses any life points your opponent would gain into effect damage, morphing cards that would normally help your foe into lethal burn engines instead. Simochi's especially deadly when your opponent plays a card with mandatory (not optional) life gain, like Solemn Wishes.

10 Best Support Cards for Simochi

But on its own, Simochi can only do so much. To really let this poison shine, you'll want to fill your deck to the brim with spiked elixirs ready to sap your foe's health away. But with dozens of potential supports, which units reign supreme? These are ten of the best Yu-Gi-Oh cards to combo with Bad Reaction to Simochi!

  • Griggle
  • Lava Golem
  • Rain of Mercy
  • Kuribon
  • Battle Fader
  • Dark Cure
  • Soul Taker
  • Upstart Goblin
  • Darklord Nurse Reficule
  • Gift Card
Griggle

Griggle

10. Griggle

Type: Monster

No, it's not a McDonald's character, but Griggle, a pitifully weak plant monster. Now, be careful not to misunderstand its effect: When control of Griggle switches to your opponent, you gain 3000 life points. Sadly, it's you, not them, and so it won't combo off Simochi. That said, having that extra health in reserve can save your bacon if things get messy, and changing control will both steal a far stronger monster while leaving your opponent with a vulnerable 350 ATK weakling.

Of course, you'll need other effects to actually exchange control of your monsters, so combo Griggle with cards like Creature Swap or Switcheroo to both fortify your own life while pilfering enemy forces. As you pit your opponent's monsters against them, you'll be providing yourself with time to complete your sabotage tactics.

Lava Golem

Lava Golem

9. Lava Golem

Type: Monster

Marik's classic Lava Golem can't be summoned to your field. Instead, by sacrificing your normal summon/set for the turn, you can tribute two opposing monsters to special summon Golem to your opponent's field. You've now eliminated a pair of their units, and Golem's effect will inflict 1000 damage to your foe during their standby phases!

Sure, you've handed your opponent a monster with 3000 ATK, but you should have a good assortment of defensive cards to stave off any potential blows. Even if your opponent tributes Golem or uses it as link or xyz material in their main phase, they've still lost their initial two units and suffered 1000 damage. As if that weren't enough, note that Golem's ability inflicts damage without Simochi's conversion, letting you brandish it even if you haven't yet played your staple.

Rain of Mercy

Rain of Mercy

8. Rain of Mercy

Type: Spell

Here's a blessedly simple magic card: Rain of Mercy provides both players with 1000 life points. So, with Simochi out, you're both replenishing your own life points while sapping your opponent's. 1000 is a fair chunk out of your starting 8000, and between the Golem damage and other Simochi poisons we'll encounter, your foe won't last long against this Trojan horse punishment.

Kuribon

Kuribon

7. Kuribon

Type: Monster

This Kuriboh knockoff helps with both stalling and effect damage. Sure, it's miserably, bearing 300 ATK and 200 DEF, but when your opponent attacks it, Kuribon can negate the battle damage, give your opponent life points equal to the swinging monster's ATK, then return itself to your hand.

If you've already activated Simochi, your opponent's faced with a tough choice. If they attack Kuribon, it'll bounce back to your hand (ready to be summoned in future turns) and they'll take damage equal to their monster's ATK. But they don't strike at Kuribon, well, you're indefinitely shutting down their battle phases. For such an easily summoned card, this offers an awesome win-win no matter what they choose.

Battle Fader

Battle Fader

6. Battle Fader

Type: Monster

One of the best hand traps in the game, Battle Fader admittedly doesn't play off Simochi's sapping, as it won't give your opponent life points. However, don't overlook the importance of defending yourself—remember, while you're poisoning your opponent, they're probably assaulting your life points with an army of beefy monsters.

Luckily, Battle Fader can special summon itself from your hand when your opponent declares a direct attack, immediately ending the battle phase. Doing this means Fader will banish itself when it leaves the field, but you've halted an entire turn's combat potential and now have a monster ready to be used as either link material, tribute material, or simply as a blocker on upcoming rounds.

Dark Cure

Dark Cure

5. Dark Cure

Type: Trap

Dark Cure fully depends on having Simochi (or its upcoming alternative) fielded, so be careful not to counter your own strategy if your ace falls. However, this continuous trap forces your opponent to gain life points equal to half the ATK of a monster whenever they summon.

If they cast multiple monsters, you get to pick which one the effect impacts, helpfully letting you select the strongest while you have Simochi or the weakest if you've lost it. As icing on the cake, note that Dark Cure isn't once per turn, letting you use it multiple times in a single round, and it applies with all types of summoning: normal, special, and even flip.

Soul Taker

Soul Taker

4 Soul Taker

Type: Spell

Soul Taker simply targets and destroys an opposing face-up monster, then gives your opponent 1000 life points. Of course, with Simochi active, you'll actually be smashing them for 1000 damage, making this an awesome two-for-one combo.

What else can I say? Monster removals are handy for Simochi decks since you probably won't have many strong creatures to overcome enemy forces in battle; Soul Taker annihilates foes while draining a good chunk of your opponent's health.

Upstart Goblin

Upstart Goblin

3. Upstart Goblin

Type: Spell

As of this writing, Upstart Goblin is limited, meaning you can only include one copy in your deck. However, it's an easy choice for an Anti-Cure deck for its soured healing and hand advantage. Resolving this spell simply draws a card from your deck and heals your opponent for 1000 life points. Bam, with Simochi, you've immediately replaced Upstart with a new card in hand while scoring a sweet 1000 damage.

Darklord Nurse Reficule

Darklord Nurse Reficule

2. Darklord Nurse Reficule

Type: Monster

Rather than frantically searching out Simochi with messy cards like "A Cat of Ill Omen," I recommend including the fail-safe Darklord Nurse Reficule. He's basically the monster version of Simochi, similarly altering your opponent's life gain into effect damage.

Reficule is fairly weak in battle, but he's easily summoned, can be quickly searched with "Banishment of the Darklords," and ensures you're covered even if Simochi falls to a trap removal. He's also fairy-type, useful if you're blending your Anti-Cure theme with counter traps (which fairy monsters often support).

Gift Card

Gift Card

1. Gift Card

Type: Trap

Even the best effect damage cards typically don't exceed 1000 burn damage. With a Simochi and Gift Card combo, you triple that for 3000 hurt! Yep, when activated, Gift Card provides your opponent 3000 life, converted with Simochi to become the strongest immediate effect damage (special gimmicks notwithstanding) in all of dueling.

If you have a lucky opening hand, you can even OTK (one turn kill) your opponent before their first main phase! All it takes is a set Simochi (or Reficule) and three Gift Cards. Two Gifts and two Rains of Mercy would also work; either way, you can seize victory before they even have a chance to play. This is absolutely crucial to any Anti-Cure structure.

How to Buy Bad Reaction to Simochi (Inexpensively)

Thankfully, despite its age and prowess, Simochi remains blessedly cheap, costing under two dollars. Because Simochi decks rely far less on the extra deck (where the most expensive cards usually stem from) than usual, it's a great structure for the budget duelist, and it diversifies games by forgoing the typical monster-smash win condition.

I definitely recommend trying the Anti-Cure theme yourself, but for now, as we eagerly await Konami's next expansion of opponent-healing effects to misfire, vote for your favorite card and I'll see you at our next Yu-Gi-Oh countdown!

© 2018 Jeremy Gill