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10 More of the Best Eldrazi in Magic: The Gathering

Jeremy casts spells in between his careers as a chemical analyst and campus manager.

What Are Eldrazi Cards in Magic?

Any spellcaster worth their "Black Lotus" knows of the fierce eldrazi creature subtype. These mighty behemoths cost massive amounts of mana, but enter the field with unparalleled power, toughness, and special abilities. Most are colorless, meaning you can access them in any deck, making it hard to predict when your opponent might have an eldrazi ace up their sleeve.

With incredible stats, any player who sufficiently ramp or otherwise gimmick them to the field will be rewarded with some of the game's strongest fiends. We previously tackled the ten ultimate members, but today we'll examine ten more lesser-known yet still competitive eldrazi in Magic: The Gathering!

Desolation Twin

Desolation Twin

10. Desolation Twin

CMC (Converted Mana Cost): 10

Like many eldrazi, Desolation Twin costs a ridiculous amount of mana, but enters with a daunting 10/10 (ten power and ten toughness). Plus, when you cast him, you put a 10/10 eldrazi creature token onto the field, essentially getting two units for the price of one!

When looking for ways to quickly access Twin, try to find spells that reduce price but still let you summon him; playing him to the field won't gain his token unless he was specifically cast.

Spawnsire of Ulamog

Spawnsire of Ulamog

9. Spawnsire of Ulamog

CMC: 10

Hopefully you like convenience stores, as Ulamog enters with 7/11 stats. He also harnesses the trademark eldrazi ability of annihilator 1, forcing your opponent to sacrifice a permanent whenever he attacks!

Ulamog also lets you spend four mana to create two 0/1 eldrazi spawn tokens, useful as either throwaway blockers or for their ability to sacrifice themselves and add a colorless mana to your pool. And by spending an insane 20 mana, Ulamog lets you cast any number of eldrazi you own from outside the game without paying their mana costs. You trigger this, and it's probably game over.

Not of This World

Not of This World

8. Not of This World

CMC: 7

While it's an instant, Not of this World is a rare tribal card, meaning it possesses a subtype (eldrazi) just as a creature would, useful for certain clan-dependent abilities.

World needs a hefty chunk of mana, but when it targets a creature you control with seven or more power, its price is reduced by seven, letting you cast it for free! Either way, it counters and negates a spell or ability that targets a permanent you control, an excellent defense for your bulky titans.

Endbringer

Endbringer

7. Endbringer

CMC: 6

Endbringer's cost contains five regular colorless symbols and one specific colorless, meaning the mana has to stem from certain sources like the basic wastes land. Regardless, Endbringer joins with a respectable 5/5 stats and untaps during other untap steps as well as your own, an excellent combo considering his three tap effects:

  • Tap: Endbringer deals one damage to any target
  • Tap and spend one mana: Target creature can't attack or block this turn
  • Tap and spend two mana: Draw a card

Three useful abilities and auto-untaps make it easy to attack with Endbringer on your turn, then use his utility effects on your opponent's.

Tide Drifter

Tide Drifter

6. Tide Drifter

CMC: 2

Tide Drifter is an oddity among the eldrazi, only needing two mana and actually requiring one of them to be blue. However, his devoid trait means he doesn't possess colors, a helpful boon against creatures with protection from blue.

Drifter serves as a prime blocker, wielding a fierce 0/5 stats for his low price! More than that, he boosts your other colorless creatures by +0/+1, a valuable health increase for both Drifter's fellow eldrazi and other translucent units.

Decimator of the Provinces

Decimator of the Provinces

5. Decimator of the Provinces

CMC: 10

Decimator is rather weak considering his hefty fee, entering with just 7/7 stats. However, when you cast him, all creatures you control gain trample and +2/+2 for the turn, so he really enters as a temporary 9/9! Additionally, Decimator naturally carries both trample and haste, so he can attack immediately and bleed excess damage through blockers.

You can also lower his price with his alternative emerge cost, which lets you summon him for three green mana and six colorless minus the CMC of a creature you sacrifice, letting you forfeit a weaker unit to help field Decimator.

Conduit of Ruin

Conduit of Ruin

4. Conduit of Ruin

CMC: 6

Conduit isn't as expensive as most of his clan, costing six mana, and he wields a fair 5/5 stats. When you cast him, you can search your library for any colorless creature of CMC seven or more and place it on top of your deck, manipulating your next draw with whatever troop you need.

Keep in mind that Conduit reduces the cost of the first creature you cast each turn by two colorless mana, letting you afford your aces much more quickly!

Bane of Bala Ged

Bane of Bala Ged

3. Bane of Bala Ged

CMC: 7

Bane of Bala Ged needs a hefty chunk of seven mana, but brandishes a sturdy 7/5 stats. While he doesn't possess the traditional annihilator ability (which forces opponents to sacrifice permanents when you attack), Bane brandishes a variant that's even better. When he swings, your opponent has to exile two permanents, essentially offering an upgraded annihilator 2 that prevents the possibility of future graveyard recoveries.

With his fierce traits and reasonable mana price (for the eldrazi), Bane remains a personal favorite and easy pick for eldrazi commander decks, especially since he's astonishingly cheap, often costing less than a single dollar!

All is Dust

All is Dust

2. All is Dust

CMC: 7

Like Not of this World, All is Dust is a seven-cost non-creature spell that technically counts as an eldrazi thanks to its tribal status. This sorcery simply forces all players to sacrifice any colored permanents they control.

If you're running a dedicated colorless deck, you'll avoid the blast, but your opponent's saturated permanents will all fall victim to its massive field wipe. Since Dust doesn't target or destroy, it even works on enemies with indestructible or hexproof, making it a brutal removal that few adversaries can recover from.

Emrakul, the Promised End

Emrakul, the Promised End

1. Emrakul, the Promised End

CMC: 13

Both of Emrakul's forms rank among the best (and most expensive) eldrazi. Promised End needs a whopping 13 mana, but this price is reduced by one for each card type in your graveyard, often bringing him down to single-digit numbers. Plus, when you cast Promised End, you gain control of an opponent during their next turn, letting you cast their own cards against them and make purposefully bad plays! Note that they immediately receive an additional regular turn afterwards, so don't celebrate too much, but this is still a daunting debuff.

While he lacks annihilator, Promised End wields flying, trample, and protection from instants, serving as a brutal combatant who can't be targeted with instants like "Swords to Plowshares," making him difficult to eliminate.

How to Support the Eldrazi in Magic

Renowned both in Magic's lore and in its community, fans adore the evil eldrazi invaders for their unique theme and unrivaled power. Affording their costs takes either extreme ramping or free-creature gimmicks like "Mosswort Bridge" and "Elvish Piper," but any duelist willing to put in the effort commands the strongest creatures in the game.

Colorless-mana providers like "Metalworker" and "Mishra's Worshop" can also adeptly ramp for your behemoths, but for now, as we eagerly await more colossal Magic creatures, vote for your favorite eldrazi, and I'll see you at our next MTG countdown!

© 2018 Jeremy Gill

Comments

Rex H on November 19, 2019:

For some reason I was told that an attacker would deal the total damage to all blockers. I know I am asking a lot of questions. Sorry. Though I really appreciate your answers. The people who taught me Magic are not very reliable when it comes to some rules. Thanks

Jeremy Gill (author) from Louisiana on November 18, 2019:

@Rex H

Breaker would deal a *total* of 10 damage, not ten to every creature. So he's not quite a field wipe, but can still be pretty deadly considering he forces all able blockers to block him.

Rex H on November 18, 2019:

I have a question about the card “Breaker of Armies.” If he attacks, does he deal 10 damage to all blocking creatures? If so, that would make him essentially a field wipe on your opponent’s creatures. Perfect anti-swarm card. But I have a feeling that there is a catch. I just don’t know what it is...