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Top 10 Turn-Two Mana Weenies in Magic: The Gathering

Jeremy casts spells in between his careers as a chemical analyst and campus manager.

Rofellos is amazing but banned in commander format

Rofellos is amazing but banned in commander format

What to Look for in a Two-Cost Mana-Tapper

Speed matters in Magic; the faster you play, the quicker you set up your board and start pressuring opponents while saving mana for removals. Green excels at mana ramping, offering many low-cost creatures that can tap for resources, supplementing your lands.

Today we're skipping the one-cost cards (like Llanowar Elves) and jumping to your two-cost options. The best of these can provide more than one mana in certain situations, offer draws, or provide tribal synergy—which reign supreme? These are the best two-cost mana-tapping creatures in Magic: The Gathering!

Menagerie Curator

Menagerie Curator

10. Menagerie Curator

Use in: Decks with varying creature types

Curator doesn't offer much tribal synergy, and while he can tap for any color, you can only use that mana on creature spells. However, he has solid 1/3 stats and draws whenever you cast a creature spell that doesn't share any subtypes with other creatures in your deck.

This rewards your using less-common types like ooze, kraken, horror, and more. Sadly, Curator is only available in online game MTG Arena, but he's still essential in the right builds.

Overgrown Battlement

Overgrown Battlement

9. Overgrown Battlement

Use in: Defender/wall decks

Battlement simply taps for one green per creature with defender (ones that can't attack) you control; counting himself, that's at least one green. But this quickly skyrockets in dedicated wall commander decks.

He's also a strong budget option even if your deck only has a few defenders, as his 0/4 stats can hold off early red or white aggro.

Manaweft Sliver

Manaweft Sliver

Gemhide Sliver

Gemhide Sliver

8. Manaweft Sliver/Gemhide Sliver

Use in: Sliver decks

Absolutely essential for increasing speed of the incredibly-tribal sliver decks, both of these cards let slivers tap for a mana of any color, empowering both themselves and your other slivers. Manaweft is a bit better since it only gives the trait to your slivers, while Gemhide does it for all, but I'd recommend both to sliver commander decks.

Chronicler of Worship

Chronicler of Worship

7. Chronicler of Worship

Use in: Shrine decks

Another Arena-exclusive card, Chronicler is a weak 1/1 with little tribal synergy. However, he can tap for a mana of any color, and on entry, places a random shrine (enchantments that power up per shrine you control) from your deck's top seven cards into hand, also making it cost one less mana to cast.

In short, while Chronicler really only belongs in shrine decks, he really belongs in shrine decks.

Incubation Druid

Incubation Druid

6. Incubation Druid

Use in: Elf decks

Incubation starts as an unimpressive 0/2 who taps for one mana of a type matching one of your lands, but at least she has the elf subtype. Better yet, she can adapt by spending five mana, which not only gives her three +1/+1 counters, it lets her tap for three mana instead of one.

Bonus points if you can reduce Incubation's adapt cost using cards like Training Grounds or Biomancer's Familiar. Alternatively, enter with a +1/+1 using The Great Henge so she never has to adapt to tap for three.

Katilda, Dawnhart Prime

Katilda, Dawnhart Prime

5. Katilda, Dawnhart Prime

Use in: Human decks

Katilda offers a rare but appreciated support for humans, letting yours (including herself) tap for a mana of any color. With the right tokens, this can provide one of the best ramps in the game. Plus, she she can spend six and tap to give each of your creatures a +1/+1, and while her stats start at a weak 1/1, she has protection from werewolves.

Devoted Druid

Devoted Druid

4. Devoted Druid

Use in: Elf decks

Druid simply taps for a green, but she can untap by giving herself a -1/-1 counter. Since she only starts at 0/2, you can usually only do this once, but it's a nice burst when you needed.

Better still, a popular infinite mana play combines Druid with white's Vizier of Remedies (another two-cost play that gives your creatures one less -1/-1 when they would acquire one), leading to infinite green mana.

Sanctum Weaver

Sanctum Weaver

3. Sanctum Weaver

Use in: Enchantment decks

Sanctum's another weak 0/2, but taps for mana of any one color equal to the number of enchantments you control; counting herself, that's at least one, but this skyrockets in enchantment-based decks like Sythis, Harvest's Hand.

Bloom Tender

Bloom Tender

2. Bloom Tender

Use in: Multicolor decks

In addition to elf tribal synergy, Bloom Tender taps for one mana of each color among permanents you control. While this doesn't work for colorless, it's one green by default and up to five! Use this in rainbow commander decks like Slivers or with five-color cards like The Prismatic Bridge for insane ramping.

For a similar three-cost card, I also recommend Faeburrow Elder.

Priest of Titania

Priest of Titania

1. Priest of Titania

Use in: Elf decks

Priest taps for one green per elf on the field. Yep, this counts opposing elves, punishing opposing mana weenies and other elves. If you luck out and face an elf tribal deck, or builds that use all-type changelings, sit back and laugh as you gain enough mana for practically any move.

Mana-Gaining Cards

In addition to today's spells, consider the abilities of creatures like Lotus Cobra, who doesn't technically tap for mana, but adds one whenever you play a land. Of course, there's also mana rock artifacts to consider, but for now, vote for your favorite card and I'll see you at our next MTG countdown!

© 2022 Jeremy Gill