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Top 10 Commander Board Wipes in Magic: The Gathering

Jeremy casts spells in between his careers as a chemical analyst and campus manager.

Eldrazi in Magic

Eldrazi in Magic

Field Wipes in Commander

You always want a back-up plan in commander format, where you generally have three opponents and your higher starting life gives more time to setup big plays. If foes gain too big an advantage, sometimes you need board-destroying spells to reset the playing field.

While single-target removals have their place, multiplayer formats favor spells that can harass all opponents—which reign supreme? These are the ten best board wipes for several card types in commander format of Magic: The Gathering!

Merciless Eviction mtg

Merciless Eviction mtg

10. Merciless Eviction

CMC (Converted Mana Cost): 6

While not the most efficient mana-wise, Eviction excels in both effect and versatility, letting you exile all artifacts, creatures, enchantments, or planeswalkers. While you only get to choose one, it's still a dangerous and adjustable ability, able to circumvent defenses like indestructible.

Akroma's Vengeance mtg

Akroma's Vengeance mtg

9. Akroma's Vengeance

CMC: 5

Unlike Eviction, Vengeance destroys its targets, not as effective as exiling them, but this time you get to blast creatures, artifacts, and enchantments! This clears most of the field, perfect for instant/sorcery or planeswalker-focused decks.

As a bonus, you can cycle Vengeance for three, letting you draw a new card if it's not what you need at the moment.

Armageddon mtg

Armageddon mtg

Sunder mtg

Sunder mtg

8. Armageddon/Sunder

CMC: 4/5

Here are arguably the best land-nukes in the game. White's Armageddon simply destroys all lands for four, a brutal blast that you can rig in your favor with indestructible lands like "Darksteel Citadel".

Or, blue's Sunder cost five, but bounces all lands to hand and works at instant speed, meaning you can wait until your last opponent's end phase to trigger it. This should force them to discard; use infinite hand-size spells like "Thought Vessel" to ensure you keep your excess.

Evacuation mtg

Evacuation mtg

7. Evacuation

CMC: 5

Evacuation is Sunder but for creatures instead of lands, instantly bouncing all back to their owner's hands. Again, wait until right before your turn to hit the most foes and possibly make the turn player discard. Evacuation also excels against tokens, which stop existing when they leave the field.

All Is Dust mtg

All Is Dust mtg

6. All Is Dust

CMC: 7

The ultimate board wipe for colorless decks, Dust is expensive but forces all players to sacrifice colored permanents they control. This hits most things that aren't artifacts or lands, but with a colorless deck (or an already-empty field), you won't mind while your opponents will suffer ransacked board states.

Dust is also a tribal sorcery, meaning it counts as an eldrazi card (useful for effects like "Eye of Ugin").

Blasphemous Act mtg

Blasphemous Act mtg

5. Blasphemous Act

CMC: 9

Red is considered one of EDH"s weaker colors, but it offers this potent creature-killer that works best with multiple opponents. Act inflicts a whopping 13 damage to all creatures and discounts itself by one for every creature on the field, meaning with eight or more, you can cast it for just one mana.

That's enoughdamage to topple just about anything, giving you the power of a field wipe at a heavily-reduced cost.

Serenity mtg

Serenity mtg

4. Serenity

CMC: 2

This one's often-underrated since it hasn't seen print in awhile, but Serenity is one of the easiest and cheapest nukes available, albeit with a delay. At the start of your upkeep, it destroys all artifacts and enchantments (including itself) and prevents them from regenerating!

So you're hitting two card types, clearing the field of Sol Rings, Mana Crypts, and far more. Your opponents have a round to try to eliminate Serenity before it triggers, but usually, only the player who has the most to lose will even try, as the others probably want you to topple their biggest threat.

Nevinyrral's Disk mtg

Nevinyrral's Disk mtg

Magus of the Disk mtg

Magus of the Disk mtg

3. Nevinyrral's Disk/Magus of the Disk

CMC: 4

Nevinyrral's Disk comes in tapped, so you have to wait to use its effect. But by tapping it and spending one, it'll destroy all creatures, enchantments, and artifacts (including itself). Unlike practically every other board wipe, you can pay most of its mana cost ahead of time, activate it at instant speed, and use it anywhere regardless of your commander's color identity.

White also employs Magus of the Disk, a 2/4 creature with the same effect, entering tapping but tapping and spending one to nuke three card types.

Wrath of God mtg

Wrath of God mtg

Damnation mtg

Damnation mtg

2. Wrath of God/Damnation

CMC: 4

Identical except for color, Wrath and Damnation both destroy all creatures and prevent regeneration. It's as simple as that; these are some of the cheapest creature nukes available, especially considering their regeneration punishment.

Regenerating creatures aren't common these days, but whenever they pop up, you'll be glad you had something that can bypass their defense.

Cyclonic Rift mtg

Cyclonic Rift mtg

1. Cyclonic Rift

CMC: 2 (6 with overload)

Cast Rift for two, and it simply bounces a non-land back to hand, a simple yet decent instant removal. But Overload it for six and you bounce all non-lands you don't control back to hand!

Along with aces like "Mana Drain", Rift is one of the big reasons blue is so feared in EDH, as instantly eliminating everything other than lands but without touching your own field is devastating. Other than a counterspell, almost nothing can save foes; as hexproof, protection, and indestructible all fail to stop it.

Other Removals in Magic

Today we saw several spells to clear the field and rebound from a losing position, but your options only begin here. Several planeswalkers and sagas offer removals as part of their effects.

And some cards don't technically clear the field, but makes certain plays much harder, like "Aura Flux", which forces players to pay two mana each turn to keep their enchantments, and "Archfiend of Depravity", which only allows opponents two creatures. But for now, vote for your favorite nuke and I'll see you at our next MTG countdown!

© 2020 Jeremy Gill