Top 10 Sideboard Cards for "Fae of Wishes/Granted" MTG Decks - HobbyLark - Games and Hobbies
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Top 10 Sideboard Cards for "Fae of Wishes/Granted" MTG Decks

Jeremy casts spells in between his careers as a chemical analyst and campus manager.

Fae of Wishes/Granted mtg

Fae of Wishes/Granted mtg

Using "Fae of Wishes" in Magic: The Gathering

MTG's Throne of Eldraine set introduced many two-sided adventure cards, which can either be cast as creatures, or into exile as sorceries/instants, from where you can later cast the creature.

One of the best is Fae of Wishes/Granted. Fae is a 1/4 creature with flying, a decent early-game blocker, but the real treat is Granted, which lets you add a non-creature from your sideboard to hand. But your side deck can only hold 15 cards at once; which spells help you tackle any situation? Here are ten awesome standard-legal (as of this writing) sideboard choices to tutor with Fae of Wishes!

Note that since Fae is mostly seen in adventure decks, we're covering cards with colors they generally use (red, green, and blue).

Mystical Dispute mtg

Mystical Dispute mtg

10. Mystical Dispute

CMC (Converted Mana Cost): 3

One of Granted's best features is its ability to pull cards based on what your opponent is running. For instance, take Dispute, which counters a card unless its owner pays three mana. And if the spell you're trying to counter is blue, you can cast Dispute for just one blue!

So when you see islands, Dispute is a great trick to pull, and if your opponent isn't running blue, maybe grab something else ("Sublime Epiphany" works well). Just remember that you have to reveal the card you tutor, so your foe will know you have a counterspell in hand.

Embercleave mtg

Embercleave mtg

9. Embercleave

CMC: 6

Embercleave is often used in red aggro, as its effect discounts its hefty price by one per attacker you control (down to a minimum of two). But it flashes in at instant speed for a dominating +1/+1 boost alongside trample and double strike, amazing aggressive boosts.

Adventure decks aren't as fast, which means you might not want to clutter your main deck with a card that's dead in hand for so long. But when you're winning and need something to cement an offensive push, you'll find few better equipments.

Shadowspear mtg

Shadowspear mtg

Garruk's Uprising mtg

Garruk's Uprising mtg

8. Shadowspear/Garruk's Uprising

CMC: 1/3

These cards are tempting enough you might want to just use one or both in your main deck, but if not, the side board also works. Shadowspear is cheap and reusable, equipping for +1/+1, trample, and lifelink. Uprising gives all your creatures trample and draws whenever one with four or more power enters your field—easy in adventure decks thanks to cards like "Lovestruck Beast", "Beanstalker Giant", and "Bonecrusher Giant".

Both give trample, which is also nice since (despite being a green staple) it's notably absent on Beast and Beanstalker. And Shadowspear's lifelink is a great way to counter one of the adventure theme's biggest weaknesses (a lack of life-replenishing options).

Stern Dismissal mtg

Stern Dismissal mtg

Gust of Wind mtg

Gust of Wind mtg

7. Stern Dismissal/Gust of Wind

CMC: 1/4

Using Granted costs four mana, which means it's nice to have cheap spells in your sideboard because you probably won't have many resources left to use that turn. Enter Stern Dismissal, an excellent stall tactic that instantly bounces an opposing creature or enchantment for just one.

Or, try Gust of Wind. It's only a sorcery, but its cost of four goes down to two if you control a creature with flying—like Fae of Wishes. Then, you bounce any opposing non-land and draw a card, an excellent deal for two mana. Wind is also one of today's cheapest cards, costing less than a single dollar!

Genesis Ultimatum mtg

Genesis Ultimatum mtg

6. Genesis Ultimatum

CMC: 7

My favorite of the powerful three-color Ultimatum sorceries, Genesis Ultimatum is very color-particular and expensive, which means it's dead in hand without some serious ramping. But once ready, nab with a late-game Granted to ensure you have a devastating round, as Genesis lets you play any number of permanents (including lands) from your deck's top five cards for free, placing the rest into your hand.

As a bonus, you don't have to reveal the cards that go to hand, so your opponent won't know what you're hiding.

Return to Nature mtg

Return to Nature mtg

5. Return to Nature

CMC: 2

Since not all decks run artifacts/enchantments, many themes don't include many checks against them, making sideboard tools like Nature essential when you're up against a "Great Henge" or such.

Nature simply destroys an artifact or enchantment, or exiles a card from a graveyard. All good counters that you can pick based on what your opponent runs. You can even take out the Theros god enchantments if you first remove their indestructible trait with Shadowspear.

Redcap Melee mtg

Redcap Melee mtg

4. Redcap Melee

CMC: 1

Maybe you have only one mana to spare, or maybe you only have red left after using Granted—consider Redcap. It deals a whopping four damage to a creature or planeswalker, but if you hit a non-red card, you have to sacrifice a land.

Like Mystical Dispute, this works well in your sideboard since you can pull it out when you see its preferred color (it's great against enemy "Terror of the Peaks"). Heck, it can be pretty handy even against non-red thanks to the extra lands adventure builds often accumulate.

Storm's Wrath mtg

Storm's Wrath mtg

3. Storm's Wrath

CMC: 4

So far, we've seen plenty of great removals for single creatures, but when your opponent has swarmed the field, you need a board wipe to buy more time. Green and blue don't have many, making Storm's Wrath a valuable addition, as it simply deals four damage to all creatures and planeswalkers, enough to kill most aggro threats.

It'll hit your own units as well, so time it carefully, but some of green's adventure creatures (Lovestruck Beast and Beanstalk Giant) can withstand four damage anyway.

Soul-Guide Lantern mtg

Soul-Guide Lantern mtg

2. Soul-Guide Lantern

CMC: 1

Despite its low price, Lantern is something you usually need early on, making it great to tuck away in your sideboard. When it enters the field, you exile a card from an opposing graveyard, an excellent way to thwart "Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath", "Kroxa, Titan of Death's Hunger" or other graveyard-dependent threats.

Plus, you can instantly sacrifice Lantern to exile all opposing graveyards, or sac it and pay one to draw a card, further harassing enemy plays or replenishing your hand.

Ugin, the Spirit Dragon mtg

Ugin, the Spirit Dragon mtg

1. Ugin The Spirit Dragon

CMC: 8

Ugin is one of the most feared cards in standard right now, as he's the endgame of many ramp themes. Which is great, but it means he's sitting dead until you can afford his hefty price of eight mana, so save him for a late-game Granted tutor.

But once out, Ugin has seven loyalty and can +2 to hit any target for three. He's also got a great board wipe, as -X exiles all colored permanents of cost X or less (and this ignores the colorless "Lucky Clovers" that adventures run). You'll probably win before you get up to -10, but when you do, it gives seven life, draws seven cards, and lets you place seven permanents from your hand onto the field; good luck recovering from that board state.

Using Fae of Wishes in Other Decks

Today we mostly explored adventure deck-based spells, but you'll also see Fae in other themes; she can fit in flying aggro, blue/white/red non-creatures, or even faerie/wizard tribals (for commander).

Depending on your theme and colors, you'll want to alter your sideboard accordingly, but remember to keep a variety of answers of different costs to help you tackle any situation. But for now, vote for your favorite out-of-deck tool and I'll see you at our next MTG countdown!

© 2020 Jeremy Gill