Top 10 Monsters With Weird Stats in Yu-Gi-Oh - HobbyLark - Games and Hobbies
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Top 10 Monsters With Weird Stats in Yu-Gi-Oh

Jeremy enjoys dueling in between working as a chemical analyst and campus building manager.

Standard Attack Scores in Yu-Gi-Oh

Yu-Gi-Oh monsters generally possess more ATK the higher their level or rank, usually offering between 0–5000. In fact, ATK has only grown more important in recent years, as link monsters don't have DEF scores, meaning they can only exist in attack position.

ATK is crucial because the more you have, the more damage you deal, and the harder it is to destroy your monster in battle. Yet we've seen a few oddballs who break conventional ATK rules, offering odd or incredible high values. So, which creatures ignore standard conventions? Here are ten monsters with weird ATK values in Yu-Gi-Oh!

10. Obelisk the Tormentor (Anime)

  • ATK:
  • DEF:

Both Obelisk's illegal and legal cards bear 4000 ATK, which (other than being unusually high) isn't particularly odd. However, like many cards in the anime, Obelisk's effects are different, and he can tribute two other monsters to grant himself infinite ATK and DEF!

Poor Kaiba never got to use the ability, as Obelisk was always under Yami Yugi's control when this effect was harnessed. Having infinity as your ATK makes it ridiculously easy to triumph, as you just need to hit an opponent's monster in attack position (or attack them directly) to cause infinite damage and immediately win.

9. Divine Serpent Geh (Anime)

  • ATK:
  • DEF:

Like Obelisk, Geh as an official TCG-legal card (thumbnailed above), but his anime form (used by Dartz against Yugi) wields infinite ATK and DEF. He drops your life points to zero when summoned, but prevents you from losing while you control him, and only a handful of stall tactics protected Yugi from Dartz's unrivaled monster.

Don Thousand/Monster C

Don Thousand/Monster C

8. Don Thousand/Monster C

  • ATK: 100,000
  • DEF: 100,000

Don Thousand is a semi-official card with a ridiculous ATK of one hundred thousand, more than ten times a player's starting life. You can't use him in most games, as he was specifically designed for "boss duels", where up to three players cooperate against a powerful boss deck wielding impressive creatures like Monster C.

Monster C can only be special summoned from your hand when his Monster B form is destroyed. He can't attack, but he prevents players from attacking other units you control. Even worse, he makes opponents immediately lose during the end phase if they didn't declare an ATK, so unless they have a card like "Honest" ready (who can add Monster C's ATK to their unit's), they'll soon be forced into unwanted combat that forces a loss.

King of Yamimakai

King of Yamimakai

7. King of Yamimakai

  • ATK: 2000
  • DEF: 1530

To help keep Yu-Gi-Oh's numbers easy to calculate, most ATK and DEF scores are divisible by 100, and occasionally they're only divisible by 50. Very few creatures deviate from these patterns, one of them being King of Yamimakai.

His ATK is fine (if low for his level) at 2000, but his DEF is an odd 1530, wandering outside the realm of 50s and 100s. Things can get messy when combined with cards that halve damage, which can start generating some really weird numbers, and I'm glad Konami soon bucked this trend. But not before releasing other duds like...

Sword Arm of Dragon

Sword Arm of Dragon

6. Sword Arm of Dragon

  • ATK: 1750
  • DEF: 2030

1750 ATK is slightly unusual but not unheard of, while 2030 DEF is yet a rare score that can also lead to weird life point values. Thankfully, just like King, Dragon's stats are low for a monster that needs a tribute to normal summon, and he lacks any effects, so you're unlikely to ever encounter him in a serious match.

Dark Chimera

Dark Chimera

5. Dark Chimera

  • ATK: 1610
  • DEF: 1460

Another tribute-needing level five normal monster, Chimera's stats are not just poor for his size, but they're both outside the 50-divisible rule. Thus, he's annoying more than challenging, forcing us to actually pay attention to our math mid-duel (a fate worse than death, I know).

Barox

Barox

4. Barox

ATK: 1380
DEF: 1530

Another troop with weird scores in both ATK and DEF, Barox is a fusion monster who resides in your extra deck. In addition to his abnormal stats, he's one of Yu-Gi-Oh's worst cards, as he needs two specific monsters as material (neither of whom is particularly good), has no special effects, and can be beaten in battle by many normal monsters, even ones who don't need tributes.

Reaper of the Cards

Reaper of the Cards

3. Reaper of the Cards

  • ATK: 1380
  • DEF: 1930

Neither Reaper's ATK nor DEF is divisible by 50, but he actually carries an effect. When flipped face-up, Reaper lets you destroy a trap; if you target a face-down card, you reveal it to check whether it's a trap (and is thus destroyed). For his day and age, Reaper was a decent trap removal, but he still needs a tribute to set and his stats remain an unusual pairing.

Castle of Dark Illusions

Castle of Dark Illusions

2. Castle of Dark Illusions

  • ATK: 920
  • DEF: 1930

Finally, a card that doesn't need tributes, Castle's stats are weird but respectable for a level four monster, making him a decent blocker back in the day. When he flips face-up, all zombies gain 200 ATK/DEF. They also gain 200 more during each of your next four standby phases.

This is an odd ability, especially considering Castle is fiend-type, not zombie, and won't benefit from his own effect. It made him a handy support for early undead decks, but when combined with his unusual stats, Castle ranks among the game's weirdest cards.

Number S39: Utopia Prime

Number S39: Utopia Prime

1. Number S39: Utopia Prime

  • ATK: 2510
  • DEF: 2000

Most of today's cards have the excuse of being old, explaining why their stats don't conform; but Prime is a much more-recent xyz monster whose ATK is an odd 2510. You summon him from your extra deck by melding three level four light-attributed monsters, or you can cast him using "Number 39: Utopia" (another xyz monster) as material.

Either way, Prime's 2510 ATK is unusual but superior to most rank four monsters, and if your opponent's life points are at least 3000 higher than yours, he can detach three xyz materials to destroy all opposing special summoned monsters, banish them, and inflict 300 damage to your opponent for each. While risky, this can really turn the tide of a duel and clear the way for a final assault.

More of Yu-Gi-Oh's Weirdest Monsters

For years, we thought the 50-divisible precedent had become law, but Prime proves Konami will still bend their own rules on occasion, and only time will tell what surprises future sets have in store. After all, they've stepped outside their comfort zone before, breaking the "two-tribute monster ATK doesn't exceed 3000" standard with creatures like "Super Conductor Tyranno."

Many of today's cards are either outdated or anime-only, but when you occasionally see one arise, pay attention to its unusual values so you don't misplay. But for now, as we await Konami's next expansion of misfit monsters, vote for your favorite card and I'll see you at our next Yu-Gi-Oh countdown!

© 2019 Jeremy Gill