Top 30 Worst Yu-Gi-Oh Cards Ever Made

Updated on October 9, 2019
Jeremy Gill profile image

Jeremy enjoys dueling in between working as a chemical analyst and campus building manager.

What Are the Worst Yu-Gi-Oh Cards of All Time?

What makes a Yu-Gi-Oh card bad? Not just unremarkable, but actually scraping the bottom of the bottom? Well, Konami's worst cards are often spells/traps that hurt more than help you or monsters with difficult summoning conditions and little payoff.

Dueling's advent was an interesting time, as some original cards were drastically overpowered and are still banned today ("Pot of Greed," "Harpie's Feather Duster," etc.) while others—well, you'll see. So, which misfits should be avoided at all costs? These are the 30 worst cards in Yu-Gi-Oh!

The 30 Worst Cards

#30–21
#20–11
#10–1
Shien's Spy
The Inexperienced Spy
Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth
Lucky Punch
Boar Soldier
Gate Guardian
Jar Robber
Card of Sanctity
Hungry Burger
Nanana
Dark Sage
Elemental HERO Neo Bubbleman
Pyro Clock of Destiny
Sparks
Red-Eyes Black Metal Dragon
Gamble
Dancing Elf
Pot of Generosity
An Unfortunate Report
Dark Artist
Cold Feet
Card Shuffle
Darkness Approaches
Zone Eater/Swordsman from a Distant Land
The Gift of Greed
Appointer of the Red Lotus
Fusionist
White Hole
The Humble Sentry
Larvae Moth
Shien's Spy
Shien's Spy

30. Shien's Spy

Type: Spell

Spy gives an opponent control of one of your face-up monsters until the end of the turn. This just isn't useful in most cases, but on occasion, it can hand them a weak creature in attack position, letting you swing at it for heavy battle damage.

Okay, but even if that's your game, you might as well use the spell "Creature Swap" instead to get a monster in return. As a final sin, Spy's misleading name implies it's a member of the Shien archetype when it isn't (due to its original Japanese name).

Lucky Punch
Lucky Punch

29. Lucky Punch

Type: Trap

Once per turn, when an opposing monster attacks, Lucky Punch lets you flip three coins. Three heads lets you draw three cards while three tails destroys Punch (nothing happens with a mix). Sure, three cards is a great reward, but the chances of landing three heads is only 1/8 and your odds of destroying Punch are just as high. Worst of all, you lose 6000 life points (75% of your starting life!) if your face-up Punch is destroyed.

You can try combining Punch with "Second Coin Toss" to activate the effects of "Dueltaining", but it's a risky combo that requires three specific cards and just isn't practical.

Jar Robber
Jar Robber

28. Jar Robber

Type: Spell

When your opponent activates Pot of Greed, you can chain Robber to negate their magic and draw a card. Of course, this relies on them playing Greed—a banned card that will forever remain illegal. Thus, it's just not going to help in official play.

Even if you're playing a casual match or the traditional format (where you might actually encounter Greed), you're still counting on having Robber ready when they use Greed, and Robber essentially becomes worthless if drawn too late, so it's just not worth it in any case.

Nanana
Nanana

27. Nanana

Type: Spell

Forgive the foreign text; this is an Asian OCG-only card (as opposed to the American TCG). Nanana grants a level or rank seven monster 700 extra ATK/DEF for the turn.

If you want 700 extra ATK, use "Rush Recklessly", or for extra DEF, use "The Reliable Guardian". Those spells aren't great, but at least they don't restrict what types of monsters you can use them on and they're quick-play, meaning you can activate them on your opponent's turn. Better yet, stat-increasing equip spells like "Mage Power" and "United We Stand" further put Nanana to shame.

Pyro Clock of Destiny
Pyro Clock of Destiny

26. Pyro Clock of Destiny

Type: Trap

Pyro Clock moves the turn count (but not the turn itself) forward by one. This affects very few cards (less than 20), and many of them are ones you wouldn't want to move forward (like "Swords of Revealing Light") unless used by your opponent, which you can't predict.

The best application is with "Final Countdown", which wins after 20 turns, but it's currently limited and simply works better with stall tactics like "Waboku" and "Battle Fader".

Gamble
Gamble

25. Gamble

Type: Trap

While it's appropriately named, Gamble is just far too risky to reliably use. First, it's hard to activate, as your hand must have two or less cards and your opponent's needs at least six (which is rare). Then, Gamble flips a coin, and if you call it right, you draw until your hand has five cards. That's a great benefit, but if you call it wrong, you entirely skip your next turn, a massive penalty that's almost sure to cost you the duel.

An Unfortunate Report
An Unfortunate Report

24. An Unfortunate Report

Type: Trap

An Unfortunate Report makes your opponent conduct their next battle phase twice. Of course, you have to be careful with this or you'll inadvertently hand them the means to win with back-to-back assaults.

The only time Report helps is when you have cards in place that function when your foe strikes, like "Yubel". Even then, your foe can simply refrain from striking unless you use forced-attack cards like "Yang Zing Unleashed". Too much effort for too little payoff, especially with the potential risk of getting invaded twice in one turn.

Card Shuffle
Card Shuffle

23. Card Shuffle

Type: Spell

This continuous spell lets you pay 300 life points once per turn to shuffle either your or your opponent's deck. 300 health isn't a huge fee, but it adds up, and in most cases, shuffling just isn't helpful, as you're trading one unknown for another.

You can combine Shuffle with "Convulsion of Nature" (which turns each deck upside-down and lets you see your next draw), but are you willing to run two bad cards for a mediocre combo? Me neither.

The Gift of Greed
The Gift of Greed

22. The Gift of Greed

Type: Trap

Gift of Greed grants Pot of Greed's benefit to your opponent, having them draw two cards. Hand advantage is crucial to any card game, so why offer them such a huge benefit? If you're trying to mill their deck and win through a forced deck-out, there are far better mill cards like "Needle Worm" that send cards to your opponent's graveyard (a safer zone to stock).

White Hole
White Hole

21. White Hole

Type: Trap

White Hole depends on your opponent running "Dark Hole", a spell that's currently limited, allowing only one copy in the deck. When your opponent activates it, White simply prevents it from destroying your monsters.

Again, you're relying on your opponent running a specific card (and having White set in time) that they'll at most have one copy of. Even worse, ever since "Raigeki" moved from banned to limited, it's more likely to be used as a monster wipe, and "Anti-Raigeki" would better serve as a counter.

The Inexperienced Spy
The Inexperienced Spy

20. The Inexperienced Spy

Type: Spell

The Inexperienced Spy simply lets you peek at a single card in your opponent's hand. And that's it. You gain a very slight tactical edge, but it's not worth wasting a draw to do it. Try cards like "The Eye of Truth" for better hand-revealers.

Boar Soldier
Boar Soldier

19. Boar Soldier

Type: Monster

Boar Soldier wields 2000 ATK, an impressive score for a monster you can normal summon without tributes, but his downsides drain any advantage. First, he's automatically destroyed if normal summoned, so he needs a special or flip summon to arrive successfully. Even worse, as long as your opponent controls at least one monster, Boar loses 1000 ATK.

Two big disadvantages don't outweigh a slight benefit you can otherwise obtain with cards like "Gene-Warped Warwolf", a normal monster (who also happens to be beast-warrior type) with 2000 ATK and no trade-offs.

Card of Sanctity
Card of Sanctity

18. Card of Sanctity

Type: Spell

Sanctity banishes all cards from your hand and field (preventing graveyard recoveries), then has you draw until you have two cards in hand. This could have been decent except for its "minimum one from each" specification. Thus, you can't exploit if when your hand/field are empty; you have to banish at least one from each, meaning you always lose at least as much as you gain.

Dark Sage
Dark Sage

17. Dark Sage

Type: Monster

Dark Mage has nice battle stats (especially his 3200 DEF), can be special summoned from either your hand or deck, and lets you search a spell from your deck when he arrives. So what's the problem? Well, he's challenging to summon, as you have to activate the effect of "Time Wizard" while you control "Dark Magician" and call the coin toss correctly (which is a 50% chance).

So, you need to have two specific monsters fielded (one of which requires two tributes to normal summon) and succeed in a luck-based mechanic before Sage will arrive. And remember, if your coin toss fails, Time Wizard's effect destroys all your monsters and inflicts half their ATK as damage to you, which should be at least 1500 with both Wizard and Magician fielded. Instead of searching spells with Sage, try recovering them from your graveyard using "Dark Magician of Chaos".

Sparks
Sparks

16. Sparks

Type: Spell

Sparks inflicts 200 effect damage to your opponent. Great, all you'll need is 40 copies of this card to win. Seriously, compare Sparks to infinitely-superior effect damage cards like "Poison of the Old Man", who inflicts four times as much damage at instant speed!

Dancing Elf
Dancing Elf

15. Dancing Elf

Type: Monster

Some once-weak normal monsters like "Skull Servant' got their own archetype to help warrant usage. Meanwhile, Dancing Elf gets to forever fade into obscurity. Her battle stats are both pitifully low without reaching zero (which would be more desirable thanks to zero-stat supports like "Masked Chameleon"), giving no reason to ever use her.

Dark Artist
Dark Artist

14. Dark Artist

Type: Monster

As bad as cards like Dancing Elf are, at least they qualify for normal monster supports. Dark Artist here offers puny battle stats and an effect that can only hinder you, cutting his already-poor DEF of 1400 in half when attacked by a light-attributed monster. Terrible stats, terrible effect, and no normal monster synergies.

Darkness Approaches
Darkness Approaches

13. Darkness Approaches

Type: Spell

Until a new errata, Darkness offered the incredibly rare effect of placing a monster into face-down attack position, but now it just changes them to face-down defense. Either way, it's a horrid card, as you have to discard two cards to use it (draining three total from your hand) just to shift a monster to face-down defense mode.

Plus, Darkness hasn't aged well considering link monsters can't move into defense mode (face-up or face-down). As an alternative, try "Book of Moon" (limited as of this writing), which offers the same effect but at quick-play speed with no discard cost.

Appointer of the Red Lotus
Appointer of the Red Lotus

12. Appointer of the Red Lotus

Type: Trap

Here's a far inferior version of the banned spell "Confiscation". As a cost, you pay 2000 life points and have to reveal all cards in your hand. Then, you look at your opponent's hand and banish one of their cards until their next end phase. Knowledge of your opponent's hand is nice, but they gain the same benefit about yours and you lose 1/4 of your starting health.

Instead of Lotus, try "Lightforce Sword", a trap that banishes a random card from your opponent's hand for four of their turns without any drawbacks.

The Humble Sentry
The Humble Sentry

11. The Humble Sentry

Type: Spell

Humble Sentry slams you with two disadvantages. First, it reveals your entire hand to your opponent. Then, it has you shuffle a card from your hand into your deck. And that's it!

You can use Sentry to reset cards that can only be special summoned from the deck (like "Stardust Dragon/Assault Mode") when prematurely drawn, but there are many better ways ("Edge Imp Sabres," "Plaguespreader Zombie," etc.) to achieve the same end.

Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth
Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth

10. Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth

Type: Monster

Moth's 3500 ATK is impressive, especially for the early days it arrived in. However, a monster only helps if you can actually summon it, and fielding Moth requires tremendous effort. You have to special summon him from your hand by tributing "Petit Moth" at least six turns after being equipped with "Cocoon of Evolution."

Doing this requires a whopping seven turns with three specific cards, giving your opponent plenty of time to find a removal (if not outright win) before Moth arrives.

Gate Guardian
Gate Guardian

9. Gate Guardian

Type: Monster

Guardian is cut from the same cloth as Moth, wielding terrific battle stats but being absurdly difficult to summon. He can't be normal summoned/set, and can only be special summoned from your hand by tributing a "Sanga of the Thunder," "Kazejin," and "Suijin" you control.

These are outdated monsters who each require two tributes to normal summon. Fielding all three at once while having Guardian in hand isn't realistic, and even if he arrives, Guardian doesn't carry any defenses to shield against an easy removal.

Hungry Burger
Hungry Burger

8. Hungry Burger

Type: Monster

Nowadays, most ritual spells access multiple ritual monsters with powerful effects. But the early ritual monsters were notoriously bad, as many lacked any abilities and demanded specific ritual spells.

Thus, you'd need both cards in hand as well as tributes ready from your hand or field to add up to your unit's level. In Hungry Burger's case, you must sacrifice at least monsters totaling level six just for a 2000 ATK monster with no special effects who can be overcome by nearly any tributed unit in the game. He also seems oddly mistyped, more resembling a fiend than a warrior.

Elemental HERO Neo Bubbleman
Elemental HERO Neo Bubbleman

7. Elemental HERO Neo Bubbleman

Type: Monster

Neo's only redeeming qualities are that his name changes to regular "Elemental HERO Bubbleman" while fielded (useful for fusion summons) and he destroys any monster he battles after damage calculation. But you can only special summon him by tributing Bubbleman from your field and discarding the spell "Metamorphosis" from your hand. This requires several specific cards just for a weak unit whose effects hardly matters since he'll probably perish in his first battle.

Also, Metamorphosis is presently banned, making Neo essentially unplayable, and even if it wasn't, you'd be sacrificing a really good card for a really bad one.

Red-Eyes Black Metal Dragon
Red-Eyes Black Metal Dragon

6. Red-Eyes Black Metal Dragon

Type: Monster

Cool name, yes. Decent ATK, sure. But Black Metal can only be special summoned by tributing your "Red-Eyes B. Dragon" equipped with the trap "Metalmorph." Not only does this specific condition rely on having two particular cards fielded, but your Red-Eyes would already have 2700 ATK thanks to Metalmorph (and would gain more upon attacking a monster), so you're really just weakening yourself.

Additionally, while it's interesting that you summon Black Metal from your deck, the fact that you can't cast him from your hand makes him completely useless when drawn. Try cards like "Red-Eyes Darkness Metal Dragon" instead.

Pot of Generosity
Pot of Generosity

5. Pot of Generosity

Type: Spell

The Humble Sentry wasn't self-harming enough for you? Try Pot of Generosity. Now, you return not one but two cards from your hand to your deck, then shuffle it. Even in the rare cases where weakening your hand might help (like with the "Infernity" archetype), look for alternatives that reduce your hand while offering a benefit.

Cold Feet
Cold Feet

4. Cold Feet

Type: Spell

Cold Feet is a quick-play spell, but it'll hinder you no matter whose turn you play it on. It simply prevents you from activating or setting any more spells or traps that turn.

How could this possibly help its controller, you ask? Well, normally it's absolutely terrible, but you can transfer the effect to your opponent with cards like "Mystical Refpanel." Still, that's just not a worthwhile prize for a combo needing two specific cards, especially when in all other cases, Cold Feet will do nothing but hamper you.

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Zone EaterSwordsman from a Distant Land
Zone Eater
Zone Eater
Swordsman from a Distant Land
Swordsman from a Distant Land

3. Zone Eater/Swordsman From a Distant Land

Type: Monster

These monsters are nearly identical, sharing the same effect and similarly-atrocious battle stats (Swordsman has 50 more DEF, for a grand total of 250). Their traits let them destroy a monster five turns after they attack it.

You're telling me we have to wait five turns for the removal to trigger? Assuming the duel hasn't ended by then, that's more than enough time for the creature to be used in a tribute or link summon. Plus, since Zone and Swordsman are so weak, you'll likely suffer massive battle damage and lose them in the attack, often rendering them not just useless but an active liability.

Fusionist
Fusionist

2. Fusionist

Type: Monster

Similar to early ritual monsters, the first fusion monsters were infamously bad, lacking effects and needing specific cards as material. But at least members like "Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon" somewhat compensated with high ATK; units like Fusionist can be defeated even by most non-tributed monsters.

Seriously, 900 ATK after spending two specific materials and a fusion spell? At least he's not alone in misery: his upgrade "Rare Fish" (who needs Fusionist and "Enchanting Mermaid" as material) arrives with 1500 ATK—a laughable sum for a card you've now spent three monsters and two fusion spells to cast.

Larvae Moth
Larvae Moth

1. Larvae Moth

Type: Monster

We've seen how Great Moth is ridiculously hard to cast, but if you somehow manage the feat, at least he offers impressive ATK. With Larvae, you must tribute Petit Moth two turns after equipping him with Cocoon of Evolution—for a monster with 500 ATK and 400 DEF.

Three cards and a delay to summon this pipsqueak? If that wasn't bad enough, unlike Great Moth, you have a limited window to play Larvae, as you must tribute Petit Moth exactly two turns after attaching Cocoon. Costly, challenging to play, and weaker than its own material (Petit has 2000 DEF while equipped), there's no reason to run Larvae other than as a self-handicap.

What do you think is the worst Yu-Gi-Oh card?

See results

More of Yu-Gi-Oh's Worst Cards

For more of Yu-Gi-Oh's biggest duds, remember to examine other early normal, ritual, and fusion monsters, whose lackluster stats and nonexistent effects rendered them obsolete even back then.

But hey, these slackers help us appreciate our better options that much more, and sometimes duelists have fun purposefully challenging themselves to build decks around lousy cards. But for now, as we eagerly await Konami's next expansion, vote for your least-favorite card and I'll see you at our next Yu-Gi-Oh countdown!

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    © 2019 Jeremy Gill

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