Radio-Controlled Cars: Brushed Motor to Brushless Motor Conversion Guide

Updated on April 16, 2018
DzyMsLizzy profile image

Liz grew up as a 'grease monkey' to her father, who taught her to fix and understand many things. She also enjoys watching auto races.

Converting Requires Purchase of New Motor and ESC

Motors in electric-powered radio controlled (RC) cars use one of two types of motors: brushed or brushless. The brushed motors are the original, older style, and the brushless are newer. In order to change over from brushed to brushless, you must first purchase a new brushless motor. It is not possible to convert the motor itself from one type to the other.

In addition, the brushless motors take a different type of electronic speed controller (ESC), so that must also be replaced.

The main advantage of going brushless is--big surprise; wait for it--there are no brushes! Hence, they are maintenance-free. Secondarily, there may be an increase in speed of the car, but this is not always the case, and should not be the main reason for making this change.

Brushed vs. Brushless Visual Comparison

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Brushed motor--bell end showing connection pointsBrushed motor--shaft endBrushless motor side view. Note pre-attached color-coded wires. (This particular one is a marine motor for model boats.  Brushless motors for cars do not have a  protruding shaft.)
Brushed motor--bell end showing connection points
Brushed motor--bell end showing connection points
Brushed motor--shaft end
Brushed motor--shaft end
Brushless motor side view. Note pre-attached color-coded wires. (This particular one is a marine motor for model boats.  Brushless motors for cars do not have a  protruding shaft.)
Brushless motor side view. Note pre-attached color-coded wires. (This particular one is a marine motor for model boats. Brushless motors for cars do not have a protruding shaft.)

Tools You'll Need

  • Small screwdrivers
  • Magnetic parts tray
  • Allen wrench
  • New brushless motor
  • New electronic speed controller
  • Small soldering gun or pencil-type soldering iron made for hobbies

Soldering Know-How is Required

  • You will need soldering know-how to complete this changeover.
  • Use rosin-core solder on electronic parts; this is not only the most effective type for electronics, it also eliminates the need for messy application of flux to the piece before soldering.

I learned to solder at a young age; I was about 8 years old, and at the time, dad had a heavy, old-fashioned (I'd say antique) soldering iron with about a 1-inch soldering head. It was not for delicate work!

You had to brush flux (a cleaning agent) onto the metal to be soldered beforehand. It did not smell good! But, I learned, and later, when far smaller electric soldering guns came out, it was a breeze to make the transition!

In fact, my dad complimented me on making a better solder joint than someone he'd seen at his job! And that was with the old-fashioned, heavy iron!

But, on to the process!


WARNING!!

Solder is molten lead, and is very hot; it melts at 370 degrees F. (188 degrees C).

(Plain water at 140 degrees F. will cause 3rd degree burns in just 5 seconds!)

Be careful when using, and keep flammables away from the work area.

Typical Pencil-Type Soldering Iron

A pencil-type soldering iron is the easiest to use on small parts
A pencil-type soldering iron is the easiest to use on small parts | Source

Typical Connections on Brushed Motors

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Tamiya style plug-ins.Dean's style plug-ins, male end.Dean's style plug-ins, female end.
Tamiya style plug-ins.
Tamiya style plug-ins.
Dean's style plug-ins, male end.
Dean's style plug-ins, male end.
Dean's style plug-ins, female end.
Dean's style plug-ins, female end.

Removing the Old Motor and ESC

To change your motor, remove the body from the vehicle, then remove the drive gear cover. Disconnect the motor leads from the speed controller.

Locate the motor mounting screws and unscrew them, setting aside in the parts tray.

Remove the pinion gear (smaller of the 2 gears).

Examine motor lead wires that connect the motor to the ESC and determine whether they are plug-in connectors or soldered connections. If they are plug-in, simply unplug them; if they are soldered connections, you'll need to unsolder them before proceeding.

Brushed vs. Brushless ESC Visual Comparison

Click thumbnail to view full-size
ESC for brushed motors. Note 2 sets of leads at top--one goes to battery pack, the other to motor.  The connectors at bottom go to the receiver.ESC for brushless motors.  Note connections for receiver and battery pack, but not for motor. Those plug in from the motor.
ESC for brushed motors. Note 2 sets of leads at top--one goes to battery pack, the other to motor.  The connectors at bottom go to the receiver.
ESC for brushed motors. Note 2 sets of leads at top--one goes to battery pack, the other to motor. The connectors at bottom go to the receiver.
ESC for brushless motors.  Note connections for receiver and battery pack, but not for motor. Those plug in from the motor.
ESC for brushless motors. Note connections for receiver and battery pack, but not for motor. Those plug in from the motor.

Installing the New ESC and Motor

Attach the new ESC lead wires to the new motor. ESCs for brushless motors have 5 wires to connect: 3 attach to the motor, 2 go to the battery pack. The wires for the motor are labeled, “A,” “B” and “C.” The wires for the battery are labeled positive and negative (+ and -). The wires are also color-coded to the attachement points.

When installing the new motor and ESC in the vehicle, be careful in routing the wires to avoid any contact of the insulation against moving parts, which could cause breakdown of the insulation, and a short.

Although your old motor may have had plug-in connectors, (see photos at right), all brushless motors require soldered connections. Be sure the connectors are free of dirt or any type of oily residue prior to soldering. For any heavy deposits, clean with a piece of fine sandpaper or emery cloth. Rubbing alcohol works well for minor grime, and also to finish off after a sanding treatment.

Check to be sure you have attached the wires securely to the new motor, and install it into the car. Re-install the pinion gear and drive gear cover. You are halfway done!

Brushless Motor and ESC

Showing connectors properly lined up and ready to plug in.
Showing connectors properly lined up and ready to plug in.

Removing Old and Installing New ESC

Locate the speed controller, and unplug the battery connectors. Then remove it from the vehicle. Sometimes they are screwed in with mounting screws, sometimes they are held in with double-sided foam tape.

Fit the new ESC into the vehicle. It may be necessary to move it to a different spot than was occupied by the original one, depending on size and configuration.

Decide whether you wish to use double-sided foam tape or mounting screws, if that option is available, on the new speed controller. Mount the new ESC in the chosen location; hook up the 2 power leads to a fully charged battery pack, and the 3rd wire to the receiver. Bench test the operation.

Brushless Motor Installed

A brushless motor installed in a vehicle.  This car is set up for running dirt ovals; note the skid plate and roll cage protecting motor.
A brushless motor installed in a vehicle. This car is set up for running dirt ovals; note the skid plate and roll cage protecting motor. | Source

Finished With Install--Now Test!

Double-check all your connections, and turn on the car, then your transmitter.

If the car or truck will not operate, or works erratically after you have made the changeover, double-check all your connections for tight fit and proper polarity.

Be sure your transmitter batteries are fully charged as well.

© 2010 Liz Elias

Comments

Submit a Comment

  • DzyMsLizzy profile imageAUTHOR

    Liz Elias 

    6 years ago from Oakley, CA

    Hello, KS 14--

    Thank you very much for stopping by. I'm glad you liked the article, and I appreciate your feedback.

  • profile image

    KS 

    6 years ago

    Great article, thanks.

  • DzyMsLizzy profile imageAUTHOR

    Liz Elias 

    7 years ago from Oakley, CA

    Thank you, saif113sb, I'm pleased you found the information useful.

  • saif113sb profile image

    saif113sb 

    7 years ago

    Very interesting and great information hub. Thanks Dear

  • DzyMsLizzy profile imageAUTHOR

    Liz Elias 

    7 years ago from Oakley, CA

    Hi, Micky Dee--thanks for stopping by.

    Oh dear, sorry...I guess this one and the related one on rebuilding RC shocks are pretty targeted to folks who race radio-controlled model cars in various scales.

    My husband is into it big time, and he is my go-to person for the info, since he's got over 25 years experience in the field.

    I try to cover a wide variety of topics..hopefully something for everyone. ... ... ;-)

  • Micky Dee profile image

    Micky Dee 

    7 years ago

    I loved it! I wish I knew what it was! Thank you Dear!

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