How I Made a TARDIS Shed

Updated on October 9, 2017
The finished product
The finished product

For the highly practical purposes of storage, I needed a shed. The garden being somewhat on the small side, however, meant a conventional shed wouldn't quite fit the bill. During this mild quandary, a long-repressed ambition surfaced. I would build my own TARDIS. Or perhaps more correctly, something that looked a little like a London Police Box from the last century.

I didn't really work to a plan, save for some ideas floating around in my head which largely changed as the project progressed. While I didn't document every stage (I had no reason to believe it to be a good idea at the time), I will do my best here to give the gist of what I did while entertaining the possibility that you might be suitably inspired to build a blue box in your back garden.

The Base

I started with the base. A four-foot square wooden foundation made of 4-inch by 3-inch beams cut at 45 degrees to make a square base. My mitre saw was a little dodgy, so the angles weren't perfect, but they would suffice. Next, I screwed the beams together tightly with two long screws in each corner.

Passable Pillars

Next, I moved on to the pillars. Now without a doubt, they are not an exact replica of the original, more of a variation on a theme. Nonetheless, they looked OK when finished, particularly after painting them blue (I'll tell you what I painted them with in just a little while). I used eight, 8 foot long, 4-inch by 3-inch beams, the kind you would usually use for a garden shed, then braced them together at right angles with angle brackets along the length, so the brackets faced inside, and I had something loosely resembling 4 Police Box pillars.

The roof frame resembled a Union Jack lifted in the middle. The central open ended wooden box served to lift the roof creating the slope and a cavity into which the lamp could be fitted.
The roof frame resembled a Union Jack lifted in the middle. The central open ended wooden box served to lift the roof creating the slope and a cavity into which the lamp could be fitted.

Roof

Once the pillars were drilled and bolted to the inside corners of the base, I buttressed the top with beams that I would later attach the Police Box signs to. After fitting a beam straight across the middle of the inside top beams to pull the roof tightly together, I made a 5-inch, open-ended square box and screwed it into the middle of the cross beam. I then cut 4 pieces of timber for the frame of the roof and screwed these to the sides and top of the 4 respective sides of the box screwed to the middle of the crossbeam. From above, it looked like a cross with the middle section raised, or like a shallow pyramid with a square top. Apologies for not having photos for each stage. At the time, I never thought of archiving it. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, even when building a TARDIS.

As for the roof itself, I measured the width of the roof and marked where the plywood sheet met my 5-inch square wooden box in the middle of the roof area. Then I cut it, so it covered the length of the side all the way to the central box so that I ended up with 4 triangular pieces of wood squared off at the ends. I affixed all 4 pieces, using some 2 by 2 inch strips running beneath them where the triangular roof pieces met. I fixed the 4 triangular roof pieces to the central box simply by nailing them down to the central box and the side. The central box served to lift the roof giving the roof that classic slope, and from the top, the roof frame would now resemble a Union Jack raised in the middle. I added some sealant where the roof sheets met to help keep the rain out, sprayed the whole roof area with rubberised paint, the kind you buy for cars, then painted it.

After the roof was completed, I commenced fitting the walls
After the roof was completed, I commenced fitting the walls

Colour and Cupriniol—TARDIS Blue

As far as the walls were concerned, I opted for 8 mm ply-board, cutting the boards to fit inside the pillars and using filler to seal the gaps. Once the back wall was in place, I couldn't resist the temptation to paint it. Barley wood Cuprinol was the paint of choice. Since the wood I used was slightly weathered and a little dark, it had the TARDIS blue effect, making the box look rather battered and bruised just as you would expect a time-space machine that's been in and out of a few black-holes to look.

Blue Cuprionol adds a look of Doctor Who
Blue Cuprionol adds a look of Doctor Who
Another angle...starting to look unmistakable now
Another angle...starting to look unmistakable now

Side Walls

The next job was to add the walls to either side of the entrance and paint them. The TARDIS doors would be worked on later. When asked if it's bigger on the inside, I like to point out that it was up until the point I attached the walls.

You'll see in the picture the box has a floor now. I had some old decking lying around and so fixed a few underfloor beams for support, cut the decking and attached it to the sides and underfloor supports.

Side walls attached and painted
Side walls attached and painted

Inner Frame

Once the walls were attached, it was time to attach the internal frame, which really gives the walls that classic Police Box look. The wood I used was actually free! I went to a popular DIY store and couldn't find what I was looking for inside, so took a look outside. The wood I found was leftover wood destined for the wood burner. They let me take as much as I needed. I cut it, as you can see, so it fits tight, screwed and glued it.

Inner frame cut and attached
Inner frame cut and attached

Windows (kind of)

Next, it was time for the windows. I went simply for the effect of a window rather than actually fitting a glass or perspex sheet. I think it works. Maybe you do too. What did I use? The silvery greyed out areas that pass for windows are made from underfloor insulation. I had a few sheets left over, cut it to fit with a Stanley knife and glued them in. Next, I cut thin 1 x 1 inch strips of timber to make the window frames. Some I drilled and screwed in, while others I just glued in place. Next, I painted them.

Underfloor insulation served as spacey windows
Underfloor insulation served as spacey windows
Window frames
Window frames

The Sign

I thought long and hard about the sign, but in the end opted for something fairly simple. I used some leftover plywood from the walls, cut them into suitable size strips, and painted them with black creosote. The tricky part was the lettering. I thought about painting them on but decided instead to use sticky back letters cut by myself from silver vinyl. I printed out the words POLICE PUBLIC CALL BOX in Arial font on a sheet of paper at a suitable size, cut them out, then traced around my silver vinyl, then painstakingly cut out the lettering. I found the adhesive wasn't strong enough to hold the lettering to the plywood, so I added some all-purpose glue suitable for the outdoors to make the letters firm. I screwed the sign to the top crossbeam, added a strip of beading around the sides after painting it with my trusty blue Cuprinol, and the effect was quite pleasing to the eye.

The Sign

Sign minus the frame
Sign minus the frame
Sign with frame affixed
Sign with frame affixed

TARDIS Doors!

Getting to the point of making the doors was very exciting. It meant I'd nearly finished the thing. It was fairly straightforward. I used thicker plywood for this. In fact a neighbour of mine had 2 doors from the entrance of a horse trailer which he donated. I cut them to the appropriate dimensions, fitted them with the inner frame as I had the walls, and before long I had 2 TARDIS doors! Now I know in Doctor Who the doors open inward, but given that I was going to put this thing to practical use as a garden shed, it seemed hugely impractical to do that. I would never get in the thing once I started storing things in it. So, for obvious reasons, I fitted the hinges so the doors opened outwards.

Door Number 1

I made the doors from the doors from an old horse trailer
I made the doors from the doors from an old horse trailer

Doors 1 and 2

With silvery underfloor insulation for window effect - I thought it gave it a spacey look
With silvery underfloor insulation for window effect - I thought it gave it a spacey look

Doors Near Completion

Added the sign

TARDIS doors replete with sign over top
TARDIS doors replete with sign over top

Waiting on that final piece down the middle

The doors required a final piece down the middle to finish the look
The doors required a final piece down the middle to finish the look

Finalising the Doors

The doors were practically done, but they lacked the strip that falls right down the middle the original had. That was easily remedied. I screwed some of the leftover wood I had been using for the frames to the edge of the left door so that the wide end went into the interior, then screwed another strip over the top to create an overhang to catch the second door.

Here you can see how I attached the middle strip to the left door
Here you can see how I attached the middle strip to the left door
Again you can see the middle strip running the length of the door. You can also see my cat
Again you can see the middle strip running the length of the door. You can also see my cat

Of Locks and Lamps

I fitted a very basic shed lock that serves the purpose I had in mind for this TARDIS shed. The original had a Yale lock, but for now what I have will suffice. In the photo below you can just see the top of the lamp. The lamp is non-functioning I'm afraid but could easily be replaced with a real one. I made the lamp from a soap dispenser, an old CD, and the half of the spherical part of a bed post to give it a domed appearance which I felt finished the look.

Added a lock

I added a lock as you can see, and you can just see the 'lamp'
I added a lock as you can see, and you can just see the 'lamp'

Check out the lamp on top

Can you make out the 'lamp'? It was made of a soap dispenser, an old CD, and part of a bed post
Can you make out the 'lamp'? It was made of a soap dispenser, an old CD, and part of a bed post

Fully working doors

Outward opening doors
Outward opening doors

The TARDIS!

The TARDIS! One day I'll get around to making the 'Pull to Open' sign
The TARDIS! One day I'll get around to making the 'Pull to Open' sign

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