How to Find Deep Silver Coins With the AT Pro Metal Detector

Updated on October 17, 2019
Matt G. profile image

Matt is a painter and part-time writer who loves fishing and metal detecting. Matt writes about various topics.

My Garrett AT Pro metal detector.
My Garrett AT Pro metal detector.

Finding Deep Silver Coins With the AT Pro

The AT Pro is by no means the best metal detector on the market for depth, but you will find deep silver coins with this machine when used correctly. For the price, the AT Pro metal detector, or even the Ace 400, are good quality machines to start with if you don't want to spend a ton of money going into the hobby.

I've made some awesome finds with my AT Pro, some of which were deeper targets over 10 inches deep, using the stock coil. This metal detector is great for finding silver coins if silver's what you're after. I'll provide some tips for finding deep silver coins with this machine.

Metal Detect Old Places

Location is crucial in this hobby. This is obvious, but it's so important to do research in advance and go metal detecting at historical sites from the 1800s. These places are more likely to have silver coins in the ground. You can find deep silver in old parks too, but it's becoming very difficult to find public places that haven't already been detected to death.

The best places to find silver coins, based on all of the different places I've gone metal detecting, are old home sites, both occupied and abandoned. That means knocking on doors to get permission to metal detect, which is a little awkward the first couple times you ask, but worth the effort.

Empty lots where old homes and buildings once stood are great places to find silver coins too. Abandoned sites without a building are often overlooked.

Turn Off Iron Discrimination

The iron discrimination feature on the AT Pro works well, but using it reduces coil depth. Keeping the number at zero (all metal mode) maximizes search depth, making it easier to find and hear deeper targets.

Metal detecting trashy ground in all-metal mode is, no doubt, noisy and annoying, but if you move the coil slow enough and listen carefully, you'll hear those faint silver high tones through all of the chatter.

Turn Up the Sensitivity

You should always set the machine to the Pro mode and turn the sensitivity up as high as possible. When the sensitivity is turned up too high near buried cable and power lines, the AT Pro gets scrambled easily by EMF, but you can fine-tune this setting in every situation.

I'm constantly tweaking the sensitivity when I'm coin hunting around old homes. I turn the sensitivity up all the way until I get EMF, then I'll turn it down one or two bars to stabilize the machine. You definitely want this setting turned up at least one bar below the maximum to get good depth.

Swing the Coil Slowly and Listen

Moving the coil over the ground slowly and patiently is key to finding deeper coins with this metal detector. If time permits, I'll focus on a yard section by section, moving slowly, listening for faint tones. I've returned to places I've already metal detected and recovered coins I passed up, probably from moving too fast.

Always wear headphones and turn the volume up high enough so you can hear faint tones from deeper targets. Headphones cut out background noise and make it easier to hear those deeper targets you'd otherwise have a hard time hearing.

Dig All Deep Targets

I've found that the AT Pro produces accurate target IDs most of the time, but not always, especially smaller objects more than 10-inches down. Nearby trash in the ground, the depth, soil conditions, or even a coin buried on its edge, can alter the number shown on the screen. If you rely solely on the display numbers, you're going to leave a lot of old coins in the ground for someone else to find.

I've pulled silver coins out of the ground that showed a totally different number on the screen than normal. The machine can't always be accurate. When I hunt old sites, I dig almost everything, especially anything deeper than 6-inches. You're going to dig a lot of trash in this hobby, but you have to dig the garbage to find the cool stuff.

Metal Detect a Site Twice

Finding everything in one visit usually doesn't happen, unless you detect a very small area. Unless I've found absolutely nothing but garbage, sometimes I'll make a second visit before deeming it a dud.

More times than not, you'll find something the second time that you missed the first time. Some places really are hunted out, or there was never anything there to begin with, but making another trip to places you've only been to once can pay off. The easier to find shallow targets might all be gone, but the deep ones could remain.

Is the AT Pro a Good Detector for Deep Silver Coins?

I've owned my AT Pro metal detector now for three years, and I've found hundreds of coins at various depths, some more than 10-inches deep. Some coins can be 8 to 12 inches in the ground, but most of the silver coins I find are around 8 inches deep.

Audio signals become more faint for coins deeper than 8 inches. Deep dimes, for example, don't beep as loudly as a quarter would, due to its smaller size, so you have to listen carefully for those quiet signals.

The AT Pro is a durable detector that finds coins at all depths when used correctly. Getting a feel for the settings and target sounds is something you learn over time. You can buy a high-end detector to maximize your depth, but you're going to spend thousands of dollars.

I might eventually upgrade my gear, but I'm satisfied with what I have now. I have a nice collection of silver coins that I found using this detector in various ground conditions.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

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    © 2019 Matt G.

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