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1906 Fun Facts and Trivia

Gregory DeVictor is a trivia enthusiast who loves to write articles on American nostalgia.

This article teaches you fun facts and trivia from the year 1906.

This article teaches you fun facts and trivia from the year 1906.

A Quick Look Back at 1906

What are some fun facts and trivia from the year 1906?

  1. Back in 1906, there were no smartphones, televisions, or GPS systems. There were no fast food restaurants, DVDs, or convenience foods. However, there were coloring books, marbles, and ping-pong. There were baseball cards, jigsaw puzzles, and roller skating. There were card games, singing games, and seesaws. There were also dance halls, amusement parks, vaudeville, and something called reading.
  2. President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act into law.
  3. The first cell house at USP Leavenworth opened. Archives.org explains since opening its doors, Leavenworth has been home to some of the most famous and notorious federal prisoners in history. These prisoners include Robert Stroud (better known as the “Birdman of Alcatraz”), George “Machine Gun” Kelly, labor leader “Big Bill” Haywood, and gambler Nicky Arnstein.
  4. The Wright Brothers were granted a United States patent for their "flying machine," C. C. Brown created the hot fudge sundae, and J. Stuart Blackton released the world’s first animated film.
  5. Willis Carrier received a U.S. patent for the world's first air conditioner, and Benjamin Holt invented the famous “caterpillar” tractor.
  6. George Cohan's musical George Washington opened on Broadway.
  7. The Boys' Club of America was founded, and American Greetings, Coldwell Banker, and the Kellogg Company were all launched.
  8. Oscar Straus became the first Jewish U.S. Cabinet Secretary, and John Hope became the first black president of Morehouse College.
  9. The San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed nearly 75% of the city.
  10. The Devil’s Tower in Wyoming became the first national monument.
  11. Great Britain ruled approximately one-fifth of the world.
  12. Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (which included Winston Churchill) embarked on “sweeping social reforms after a liberal landslide in the British general election.”
  13. The Baker Street & Waterloo Railway opened in London.
  14. The British Labour Party was founded.
  15. The “SOS” distress signal was selected as “the worldwide standard for help.”
  16. Back in the year 1906, the average life expectancy was 49 years, favorite baby names were Mary and John, and “dandy” described something awesome.
  17. The Chicago White Sox won the World Series, Buffalo Rag was the top record, and Edwardian-inspired clothing was all the rage.
  18. In 1906, inflation was 2.27%, unemployment averaged 5.9%, and the average annual income was $500.
  19. Gold was $18.90 an ounce, and the Dow closed above 100 for the first time.
  20. Laing’s Magic Liniment cost $1.00 for a large bottle. Three pounds of sirloin steak cost 25 cents, Nabisco 5 O’Clock Teas were nine cents a package, and the retail price of eggs averaged 15 to 34 cents a dozen.

Here are five bestselling fiction books from 1906:

  1. Coniston by Winston Churchill
  2. Lady Baltimore by Owen Wister
  3. The Fighting Chance by Robert W. Chambers
  4. The House of a Thousand Candles by Meredith Nicholson
  5. Jane Cable by George Barr McCutcheon

Here are five cool films that were released that year:

  1. A Trip Down Market Street
  2. A Winter Straw Ride
  3. Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp
  4. The Story of the Kelly Gang
  5. Three American Beauties

This article teaches you fun facts and trivia from the year 1906. Find out about popular movies, music, books, foods, sports facts, and other cool pop culture trends to get the right mix of questions and answers for your 1900s-themed trivia quiz.

Here are three trivia facts from the 1906 grocery industry: Sugar-cured bacon cost 10 cents a pound, ketchup was 75 cents a bottle, and potatoes were $2.49 a sack.

Here are three trivia facts from the 1906 grocery industry: Sugar-cured bacon cost 10 cents a pound, ketchup was 75 cents a bottle, and potatoes were $2.49 a sack.

Table of Contents

For easier reading, I have divided this article into the following categories:

  1. Retail Prices in the Year 1906
  2. History Facts From the USA
  3. International News
  4. Sports Trivia
  5. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends
  6. Nobel Prize Winners
  7. Best-Selling Books
  8. Feature Films Released
  9. Cool Pop Music Artists
  10. Number One Music Hits for the Year
  11. Famous People Who Were Born in 1906
  12. Well-Known People Who Died
  13. Food and Beverage Trivia
  14. Top American Companies, Banks, and Retailers
  15. Companies Launched in 1906
In 1906, Montgomery Ward was one of America’s largest corporations.

In 1906, Montgomery Ward was one of America’s largest corporations.

1. Retail Prices in the Year 1906

These facts from the American retail industry have been made available courtesy of the Morris County Library in Whippany, NJ.

Clothing:

  1. Boys’ shoes: 73 cents to $1.50 a pair
  2. Boys’ suit: $1.59 each
  3. Cap: 20 to 40 cents each
  4. Childrens’ boots: 99 cents a pair
  5. Childrens’ coat: $1.98-$8.50 each
  6. Corsets (W.B. Nuform): $1.00 each
  7. Men’s coat: $9.39 each
  8. Men’s shirt: 29 to 69 cents each
  9. Men’s socks (black): Three pairs for 25 cents
  10. Men’s suit: $8.89 each
  11. Men’s trousers: $1.50-$3.00 a pair
  12. Silk morning veil: $2.65-$6.75 each
  13. Women’s coat (fur-lined): $4.50 each
  14. Women’s collar: 10 cents to $1.25 each
  15. Women’s dress shoes: $4.25 a pair
  16. Women’s skirt: $4.98 each

Food and beverages:

  1. Asparagus: 20 cents per tall can
  2. Bacon (fancy sugar-cured): 10 cents a pound
  3. Beef (sirloin steak): 25 cents for three pounds
  4. Butter (Fancy Creamery): 24 cents a pound
  5. Cheese (cream): 14 cents a pound
  6. Chocolate: 30 to 60 cents a pound
  7. Cookies (Nabisco 5 O’Clock Teas): Nine cents a package
  8. Eggs: 15 to 34 cents a dozen
  9. Fish (salmon): 12 cents a pound
  10. Flour (Purina Health): 20 cents for a three-pound box
  11. Ham: 12 cents a pound
  12. Ketchup: 75 cents a bottle
  13. Milk (Borden’s Eagle Brand, condensed): 12 cents a can
  14. Nuts (fancy mixed): Two pounds for 25 cents
  15. Peanut butter: Two jars for 10 cents
  16. Peas, corn, lima beans, and string beans: Three cans for 25 cents
  17. Preserves: Nine cents a pound
  18. Pies: Two for 10 cents
  19. Potatoes: $2.49 a sack
  20. Salt: 10 cents for an eight-pound sack
  21. Spaghetti: Seven cents a box
  22. Tea (Indian Ceylon): 25 to 30 cents a pound
  23. Vanilla: 25 cents for four ounces

Furniture:

  1. Bookcase: $11.25 each
  2. Carpet (Brussels): 69 cents a yard
  3. Carpet (velvet): 85 cents a yard
  4. Chairs (Morris, mahogany): $7.98-$9.75 apiece
  5. Chiffoniers (high-narrow chest of drawers): $3.98 each
  6. China closets: $14.75-$15.65 each
  7. Parlour suite (mahogany): $45.00-$60.00
  8. Rugs (tapestry): $12.98 each
  9. Sideboards (oak): $20.00-$22.00 each

Household goods:

  1. Lamps: $1.80-$9.00 each
  2. Matches: Four cents for a 1,000-count box
  3. Pillowcases (42″ x 36″): Nine cents each
  4. Sheets (59″ x 96″): 50 cents each
  5. Soap (scouring): Seven cents each
  6. Towels (cotton damask, regular): Eight cents each
  7. Towels (cotton damask, hemmed): 12 cents each

Personal care items:

  1. California prune wafers: 25 cents for 100 wafers
  2. Irving’s Buchu Water (for kidney and urinary organs): 50 cents per container
  3. Laing’s Magic Liniment: $1.00 for a large bottle
  4. Toilet paper: 25 cents per package

Recreation and amusements:

  1. Skates (Peck & Snyder’s, steel): 60 cents a pair
  2. Sleds: 25 cents each
  3. Theatre tickets (Lyceum Theatre, “Over Niagara Falls”): 35 to 75 cents a ticket
In 1906, Theodore Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States.

In 1906, Theodore Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States.

2. History Facts From the USA

  1. Theodore Roosevelt was President of the United States and Charles W. Fairbanks was Vice-President.
  2. The U.S. population was 85,450,000.
  3. The states with the most population were Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. (Please note that California and Florida are not on this list.)
  4. The inflation rate was 2.27%. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics consumer price index, “prices in 2018 are 2,701.62% higher than prices in 1906. The dollar experienced an average inflation rate of 2.70% per year during this period. In other words, $100 in 1906 is equivalent in purchasing power to $2,801.62 in 2018, a difference of $2,701.62 over 112 years.”
  5. The unemployment rate was 5.9%.
  6. On January 12, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 100 for the first time.
  7. In February, the first cell house at USP Leavenworth opened. Archives.org explains since opening its doors, Leavenworth “has been home to some of the most famous and notorious federal prisoners in history. These prisoners include Robert Stroud, better known as the ‘Birdman of Alcatraz,’ George ‘Machine Gun’ Kelly, polar explorer Dr. Frederick Cook; labor leader ‘Big Bill’ Haywood, boxing champion Jack Johnson, gambler Nicky Arnstein, and Native American activist Leonard Peltier.”
  8. On April 18, the San Francisco earthquake and fire killed an estimated 4,000 people and destroyed 75% of the city. Earthquake.USGS.gov tells us that “At almost precisely 5:12 a.m., local time, a foreshock occurred with sufficient force to be felt widely throughout the San Francisco Bay area. The great earthquake broke loose some 20 to 25 seconds later, with an epicenter near San Francisco. Violent shocks punctuated the strong shaking which lasted some 45 to 60 seconds. The earthquake was felt from southern Oregon to south of Los Angeles and inland as far as central Nevada.”
  9. In June, the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 was signed into law by President Theodore Roosevelt. According to HealthLaw.Hofstra.edu, the law stated that “products containing substances deemed harmful must have labels listing those ingredients and the amount of each ingredient in the product. Many of the substances included on the list for regulation were drugs, but some were other types of food additives or dyes.”
  10. In June, the Meat Inspection Act was also signed into law by President Roosevelt. Britannica.com confirms that the law “prohibited the sale of adulterated or misbranded livestock and derived products as food and ensured that livestock were slaughtered and processed under sanitary conditions. The law reformed the meatpacking industry, mandating that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspect all cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and horses both before and after they were slaughtered and processed for human consumption.”
  11. In June, John Hope became the first black president of Morehouse College.
  12. In September, the Devils Tower in Crook County, Wyoming became the first national monument.
  13. In December, Oscar Straus became the first Jewish U.S. Cabinet Secretary when he was appointed by President Roosevelt as Secretary of Commerce.
  14. In December, the first annual meeting of the American Sociological Society took place in Providence, Rhode Island.

3. International News

  1. In January, Dutch law made a driver’s license mandatory.
  2. In January, the British and French began talks on military and naval issues.
  3. In January, Henry Campbell-Bannerman's cabinet (which included Winston Churchill) embarked on “sweeping social reforms after a liberal landslide in the British general election.”
  4. In February, the British Labour Party was founded.
  5. In February, Britain and France agreed to joint control of the New Hebrides, a group of islands in the South Pacific.
  6. In March, heavy storms burst a dike and flooded Vlissingen, Netherlands.
  7. In March, Finland’s Senate passed universal suffrage, except for the poor.
  8. In March, a coal dust explosion killed over 1,000 people in Courrieres, France.
  9. In March, the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway opened in London.
  10. In March, heavy storms ravaged the Dutch west coast.
  11. In March, a "Census of the British Empire" revealed that Great Britain ruled approximately one-fifth of the world.
  12. In April, Mount Vesuvius erupted and devastated Naples. According to AwesomeStories.com, a new eruption began at Mount Vesuvius in May 1905. At first, there were slow lava effusions; however, “intermittent explosive activity” started in January 1906. On April 7, 1906, the eruption reached a climax with lava fountains and earthquakes. The eruptive column of ash and gas reached a height of 13,000 meters and continued until the end of April. During the eruption of 1906, the top of Vesuvius was truncated and formed a vast crater with a diameter of approximately 500 meters and a depth of 250 meters.
  13. In April, the Olympic games opened in Athens.
  14. In April, Pentecostalism was launched as a worldwide movement.
  15. In May, Switzerland's Simplon Tunnel opened to rail traffic.
  16. In May, the U.S. and Mexico reached an agreement over water distribution rights from the Rio Grande.
  17. In May, the Olympic games closed in Athens.
  18. In May, the Vauxhall Bridge opened in London.
  19. In June, the first French Grand Prix was held at Le Mans. Fandom.com confirms that “Ferenc Szisz won the 1,238.16 km Grand Prix in his Renault ahead of Felice Nazzaro and Albert Clément. The race was run in two parts, with the cars completing six laps of the 103.18km course each day.”
  20. In June, pogroms against the Jews took place in Bialystok, Russia. (According to the OxfordDictionaries.com, a pogrom is an “organized massacre of a particular ethnic group, in particular that of Jews in Russia or eastern Europe.”)
  21. In July, pogroms against the Jews took place in Odessa, Russia.
  22. In September, the International Federation of Intellectual Property Attorneys (FICPI) was established in Basel, Switzerland.
  23. In September, domestic workers in New Zealand called for a 68-hour work week.
  24. In September, Estrada Palma, the first President of Cuba, resigned. The U.S. began “the Second Occupation of Cuba and installed a provisional occupation government,” which lasted until 1909.
  25. In November, the International Radiotelegraph Conference in Berlin selected the "SOS" distress signal as “the worldwide standard for help.”
  26. In November, London was selected to host the 1908 Olympics.
  27. In December, the British Parliament passed two important pieces of legislation: the Trades Disputes Bill and the Workingmen's Compensation Act. The Trade Disputes Bill “provided trade unions with immunity from liability for damages arising from strike actions.” The Workingmen's Compensation Act broadened an employer’s liability for employee-related accidents.

4. Sports Trivia

This information has been made available courtesy of PopCultureMadness.com. Generally suitable for all age groups, sports questions and answers are a welcome addition to any trivia quiz.

  1. World Series Champions: Chicago White Sox
  2. Challenge Cup Champs: Ottawa Hockey Club/Montreal Wanderers
  3. U.S. Open Golf: Alex Smith
  4. U.S. Tennis (men/ladies): William Clothier/Helen Homans
  5. Wimbledon (men/women): Laurence Doherty/Dorothea Douglass
  6. NCAA Football Champions: Princeton
  7. Kentucky Derby: Sir Huon
  8. Boston Marathon: Tim Ford
In 1906, the Chicago White Sox won the World Series.

In 1906, the Chicago White Sox won the World Series.

5. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends

PBS.org explains that pop culture is that loose blend of books, music, fashion and other daily ephemera that contributes to the identity of a society at a particular point in time. In the 1900s, movies, music, and books defined the essence of American pop culture.

  1. In 1906, popular baby names were Mary, Helen, Margaret, Anna, Ruth, John, William, James, George, and Robert.
  2. The life expectancy at birth for men was 46.9 years and 50.8 years for women.
  3. Benjamin Eisenstadt was born. In 1957, he created the artificial sweetener “Sweet 'n Low.”
  4. Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle, an account of the horrid conditions in Chicago’s stockyards.
  5. C. C. Brown created the hot fudge sundae at his ice cream shop on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles.
  6. The term “filet mignon” was first used by American short-story writer O. Henry in The Four Million, a collection of 25 short stories.
  7. American astronomer Clyde W. Tombaugh was born. He discovered the planet Pluto in 1930.
  8. Will Keith Kellogg launched Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company (a.k.a. W. K. Kellogg Company). The company was started to manufacture corn-flakes breakfast cereal.
  9. American biochemist Karl August Folkers was born. He isolated vitamin B12, the only effective agent known at the time to “counter pernicious anemia.”
  10. Illinois farmer Joseph Farwell Glidden passed away. On November 24, 1874, he received a patent for the first commercial barbed wire. FoodReference.com tells us that “Glidden formed the Barb Fence Company with Isaac L. Ellwood, and became one of the wealthiest men in the country.”
  11. Benjamin Holt invented the famous “caterpillar” tractor.
  12. The “Gulden's Mustard” trademark was registered.
  13. Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis was born.
  14. Cartoon animator Isadore “Friz” Freleng was born. He developed a number of cartoon characters including Bugs Bunny, Tweety Bird, Porky Pig, and Sylvester the Cat.
  15. In January, Willis Carrier received a patent for the world's first air conditioner.
  16. In January, a football rules committee legalized forward passes.
  17. In February, George Cohan's musical George Washington opened on Broadway.
  18. In March, Nora Blatch became the first woman to be elected to the American Society of Civil Engineers.
  19. In March, Rolls-Royce Limited was formed.
  20. In March, the German version of George Bernard Shaw's Caesar & Cleopatra premiered in Berlin.
  21. In April, the world’s first animated film, Humorous Phases of Funny Faces, was released. The Library of Congress tells that “J. Stuart Blackton [the creator] ‘draws’ a series of funny faces, including a line drawing of two faces, a man with an umbrella, a line drawing of two faces in profile, a clown, faces of ‘Coon and Cohen,’ the profile of a seated man, and a bottle of Medoc.” (“Medoc” is a red wine that is produced in France.)
  22. In May, the flagpole at the Chicago White Sox ballpark broke during pennant-raising.
  23. In May, the Boys' Club of America was organized.
  24. In May, Louis H. Perlman received a patent for a “demountable tire carrying rim” for cars.
  25. In May, the Wright Brothers were granted a U.S. patent (#821,393) for their "flying machine."
  26. In May, the Archaeological Institute of America was formed.
  27. In July, Rene Pottier of France won the fourth Tour de France.
  28. In August, the first Victor Victrola phonograph was manufactured.
  29. In October, Karl Nessler introduced first “permanent wave” for hair in London.
  30. In December, Alpha Phi Alpha, first Black Greek Letter Fraternity, was established. According to PopCultureMadness.com, “initial members were Henry Arthur Callis, Charles Henry Chapman, Eugene Kinckle Jones, George Biddle Kelley, Nathaniel Allison Murray, Robert Harold Ogle, and Vertner Woodson Tandy.”
  31. In December, Canadian-born Reginald A Fessenden became the first person to broadcast music over the radio.
In 1906, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company was a purveyor of groceries.

In 1906, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company was a purveyor of groceries.

6. Nobel Prize Winners

This information has been made available courtesy of PopCultureMadness.com.

  1. Chemistry: Henri Moissan
  2. Literature: Giosuè Carducci
  3. Medicine: Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal
  4. Peace: Theodore Roosevelt
  5. Physics: J.J. Thomson

7. Best-Selling Books

This book trivia has been made available courtesy of PopCultureMadness.com.

Fiction:

1. Coniston by Winston Churchill

2. Lady Baltimore by Owen Wister

3. The Fighting Chance by Robert W. Chambers

4. The House of a Thousand Candles by Meredith Nicholson

5. Jane Cable by George Barr McCutcheon

6. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

7. The Awakening of Helena Ritchie by Margaret Deland

8. The Spoilers by Rex Beach

9. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

10. The Wheel of Life by Ellen Glasgow

Other favorites:

  1. Folkways by William Graham Sumner
  2. The Life of Reason by George Santayana
  3. The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad

8. Feature Films Released

This film news has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. A Lively Quarter-Day
  2. A Trip Down Market Street
  3. A Visit To Peek Frean and Co's Biscuit Works
  4. A Winter Straw Ride
  5. Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp
  6. Dream of a Rarebit Fiend
  7. Humorous Phases of Funny Faces
  8. Magic Rose
  9. San Francisco: Aftermath Of Earthquake
  10. Solser en Hesse
  11. The '?' Motorist
  12. The Automobile Thieves
  13. The Gans-Nelson Contest
  14. The Hilarious Poster
  15. The Merry Frolics of Satan
  16. The Mysterious Retort
  17. The Scheming Gambler's Paradise
  18. The Story of the Kelly Gang
  19. Three American Beauties
  20. Whitsuntide Fair At Preston
In 1906, Orville and Wilbur Wright were granted a United States patent for their "flying machine."

In 1906, Orville and Wilbur Wright were granted a United States patent for their "flying machine."

9. Cool Pop Music Artists

These fun facts and trivia from 1906 have been made available courtesy of PopCultureMadness.com.

Henry Burr, Albert Campbell, Enrico Caruso, Arthur Collins, Byron G. Harlan, The Haydn Quartet, DeWolf Hopper, Ada Jones, Richard Jose, Harry Macdonough, James McCool, Corrine Morgan, Billy Murray, Voss Ossman, Arthur Pryor’s Band, Antonio Scotty, John Philip Sousa’s Band, Len Spencer, Frank Stanley, Harry Tally, and Bert Williams.

10. Number One Music Hits for the Year

This information has been made available courtesy of RateYourMusic.com.

  1. Vess L. Ossman: Buffalo Rag
  2. Bert Williams: Nobody
  3. Arthur Pryor’s Band: Razzazza Mazzazza
  4. Ossman-Dudley Trio: St. Louis Tickle
  5. Bert Williams: Let It Alone
  6. Billy Murray: You're a Grand Old Rag
  7. John J. Kimmel: American Cake Walk
  8. Arthur Collins: Everybody Have a Good Old Time
  9. Vess L. Ossman: A Gay Gossoon
  10. Enrico Caruso: Trovatore: Di' quella pira
  11. Vess L. Ossman: St. Louis Tickle
  12. Bert Williams: Here It Comes Again
  13. Vess L. Ossman: Sunflower Dance
  14. Henry Burr: Good Night, Little Girl, Good Night
  15. Enrico Caruso: Traviata: Brindisi/Trovatore: Di quella pira
  16. Omitted by author
  17. Pipers of H.M. Scots Guards: Cock o' the North
  18. D'Almaine & Lyons: Serenade (Schubert)
  19. Collins and Harlan: Arrah Wanna
  20. Billy Murray: College Life
  21. Mário Pinheiro: Boceta de rapé
In 1906, Edwardian-style clothing was all the rage.

In 1906, Edwardian-style clothing was all the rage.

11. Famous People Who Were Born in 1906

This celebrity news has been made available courtesy of OnThisDay.com.

  1. Adolf Eichmann: One of the main organizers of the Holocaust
  2. R. K. Narayan: Indian writer
  3. Chandra Shekhar Azad: Indian revolutionary
  4. Aristotle Onassis: Greek business magnate
  5. Leonid Brezhnev: Soviet politician of Ukrainian descent
  6. Bugsy Siegel: Mobster
  7. Puyi: Last Emperor of China
  8. Kathleen Kenyon: English archaeologist who excavated Jericho, “the oldest known continuously occupied human settlement that has been inhabited for the last 11,000 years.”
  9. Josephine Baker: Dancer
  10. Samuel Beckett: Novelist and playwright
  11. Louise Brooks: Actress
  12. Oscar Levant: American pianist
  13. Hans Asperger: Pediatrician
  14. Faisal of Saudi Arabia: King
  15. Eddie Albert: American actor
  16. Virginia Hall: American spy
  17. Ernst Ruska: Inventor of electron microscope
  18. Curtis Lemay: U. S. Air Force General during World War II
  19. Roberto Rossellini: Film director and producer, actor, playwright, and screenwriter
  20. William J. Brennan, Jr.: Lawyer and judge
  21. Albert Sabin: Physician and virologist
  22. Clifford Odets: Screenwriter, film director, and actor
  23. Johnny Hodges: Saxophonist and jazz musician
  24. Fred Whipple: Astronomer
  25. E. Sims Campbell: Cartoonist

12. Well-Known People Who Died

This information has been made available courtesy of OnThisDay.com.

  1. Marshall Field: American entrepreneur and founder of Marshall Field & Company
  2. Joseph Wheeler II: Confederate General
  3. Paul Laurence Dunbar: African-American dialect poet
  4. Ezra Butler Eddy: Canadian businessman (E.B. Eddy Company)
  5. John Batterson Stetson: American hat manufacturer
  6. Samuel Pierpont Langley: American astronomer and pioneer aviator
  7. Auguste D.: First recorded Alzheimer's victim
  8. James A Bailey: Circus showman (Barnum & Bailey)
  9. Pierre Curie: French physicist and husband of Marie Curie
  10. Spencer Gore: British tennis player and cricketer
  11. John Knowles Paine: American composer
  12. Henrik Johan Ibsen: Norwegian playwright (Peer Gynt, A Doll's House, Hedda Gabler, Ghosts, The Wild Duck, Pillars of Society, The Lady from the Sea, Rosmersholm, and The Master Builder)
  13. Harry N. Pillsbury: American chess player
  14. William Dale: international legal consultant
  15. William Painter: American inventor of the crown cork bottle cap and opener
  16. Georg Jacobi: composer
  17. William "Buck" Ewing: Hall of Fame catcher for the New York Giants
  18. Angela Burdett-Coutts: “English philanthropist extrordinaire and the richest heiress in England"

13. Food and Beverage Trivia

Here are some popular foods and beverages from 1906:

Sunday

  1. Breakfast: Grapefruit, cereal, French omelet, rice cakes, maple syrup, and coffee.
  2. Dinner: Oysters on the half shell, olives, radishes, roast veal with dressing, mashed potatoes, fried eggplant, endive salad, rhubarb pie, cheese, and coffee.
  3. Supper: Baked bean salad, deviled eggs, whole wheat bread, butter, Lady Baltimore cake, custard, and tea.

Monday

  1. Breakfast: Cereal cooked with dates, scrambled eggs with parsley, creamed potatoes, toast, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Potato cakes, cold veal, cornbread, cookies, orange, orange marmalade, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Cream of potato soup, broiled steak with parsley butter, baked potatoes, asparagus on toast, young beets and beet green salad, and poor man's pudding.

Tuesday

  1. Breakfast: Oranges, cereal, Finnan haddie, watercress, popovers, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Veal olives, baked potatoes, boiled rice, maple syrup, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Tomato soup, olives, gherkins, braised veal cutlets with currant jelly, parsnip fritters, sweet potatoes, asparagus salad, sliced pineapple, cake, and coffee.

Wednesday

  1. Breakfast: Evaporated applesauce, cereal, French olives, wheat muffins, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Clam chowder, brown bread and butter, pickles, gingerbread, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Cream of asparagus soup, filet of flounder, new potatoes with parsley butter, stewed tomatoes, lettuce salad, cottage pudding, and coffee.

Thursday

  1. Breakfast: Oranges, cereal, eggs a la caracus, rice cakes, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Hamburger steak, baked potatoes, lettuce with French dressing, raisin cake, baked rhubarb, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Vermicelli soup, radishes, pickles, pork and parsnip stew, pineapple shortcake with whipped cream, and coffee.

Friday

  1. Breakfast: Evaporated apricots, stewed, cereal, broiled mackerel, watercress, wheat muffins, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Creamed codfish, boiled potatoes, pickles, applesauce, cake, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Cream of celery soup, broiled shad, creamed potatoes, oyster plant, endive salad, tapioca pudding with meringue, and coffee.

Saturday

  1. Breakfast: Bananas and oranges, cereal, ham and eggs, graham gemn, and coffee.
  2. Luncheon: Frizzled beef, cream toast, currant tarts, and tea.
  3. Dinner: Split pea soup with croutons, pickles, pot roast of beef, browned potatoes, creamed turnips and peas, lettuce with French dressing, cabinet pudding, and black coffee.
In 1906, the “SOS” distress signal was chosen as “the worldwide standard for help.”

In 1906, the “SOS” distress signal was chosen as “the worldwide standard for help.”

14. Top American Companies, Banks, and Retailers

  1. Ames: Shovel manufacturer
  2. Baker’s Chocolate
  3. Bank of New York
  4. Bowne: Communications services
  5. CSX: Transportation
  6. Caswell-Massey: Luxury soap purveyor
  7. Cigna: Financial products
  8. Citigroup: Financial services
  9. Colgate-Palmolive
  10. Consolidated Edison
  11. DuPont
  12. Hartford Financial Services Group
  13. J. P. Morgan Chase: Banking
  14. Jim Beam (Beam, Inc): Bourbon manufacturer
  15. Lorillard: Tobacco products
  16. Macy’s
  17. Marshall Field & Company: Department store chain
  18. McCrory’s: Five-and-dime retail chain
  19. McKesson: Pharmaceuticals
  20. Montgomery Ward: Mail-order catalogs and retail stores
  21. Sears Roebuck: Mail-order catalogs and retail stores
  22. State Street: Financial services
  23. The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company: Grocery store chain
  24. Woolworth’s: Five-and-dime retail chain

15. Companies Launched in 1906

  1. Alabama Power (electric utility)
  2. American Electric Power (electric utility)
  3. American Greetings (greeting-card company)
  4. California and Hawaiian Sugar Company
  5. Coldwell Banker Real Estate
  6. G. C. Murphy Company (five-and-dime retail chain)
  7. Gannett Company (media-holding company)
  8. Invicta (Swiss watch company)
  9. Leviton (electrical-wiring equipment)
  10. Montblanc (writing instruments)
  11. New Balance (footwear)
  12. Rolls-Royce Holdings
  13. Sloan Valve Company (plumbing valves and fixtures)
  14. Standard Insurance Company (also branded as The Standard)
  15. The Aladdin Company (mail-order business)
  16. United Grain Growers (Canadian grain farmers’ cooperative)
  17. Xerox (print and digital document solutions)
In 1906, the San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed nearly 75% of the city.

In 1906, the San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed nearly 75% of the city.

References

© 2018 Gregory DeVictor