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What Should Women Wear to Salsa Lessons?

Updated on January 05, 2017
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Anya Brodech is a professional Salsa, Latin, Swing and Ballroom dance teacher in Oakland CA. Visit her website, YouTube channel and Facebook

Salsa Dancing is a Physical Activity

Let me start out by saying three things:

  1. Salsa dancing is a physical activity and you should treat it as such.
  2. You warm up when you dance and move around, and cool off when you stand still
  3. Wearing the right shoes makes your dancing easier, especially when you spin around

If you are a beginner and new to dancing, you probably won't be doing anything complicated on the first day, so don't freak out.

What Happens When You Wear the Wrong Clothes?

When you wear the wrong clothes:

  1. It takes time away from your dancing and distracts you/your partner
  2. It increases your risk for injury
  3. It makes dancing uncomfortable/inconvenient for you/your partner
  • You ending up having problems that take time away from your dancing, such as having to readjust your clothing that keeps sliding down, riding off, or slipping off
  • You distract your partner/other people by wearing something overly sexy/provocative
  • You risk tripping or falling by wearing something too long that gets caught on your feet
  • You risk ripping/tearing/snagging your clothing
  • You risk trapping your partner in your clothing (yes, really!)

What Clothes You Should Wear

For private lessons and group classes in a dance studio, your top two priorities should be function and comfort, because your primary purpose is to learn how to dance. Obviously, you can still look good, but you just want to make sure that what you're wearing is practical for dancing so you don't run into any of the problems mentioned above.

During salsa group classes and private lessons, you'll be warming up and cooling down, so it helps to dress in layers.

For salsa dancing, women can wear any of the following clothes:

  • Dresses (around knee length or a little bit shorter)
  • Skinny jeans, jeggings, or leggings (nothing baggy/flaring open at the bottom)
  • Cropped pants or capris (but no culottes)
  • Shorts, preferably dressier ones that are mid-thigh or knee length (no Daisy Dukes please!)
  • Short-sleeved or sleeveless tops (made of a light-weight, breathable material)
  • Cardigan or sweater that buttons up, zips up, or ties in front (with no hood or pockets)

What You Should Not Wear

The following list of clothing items will give you problems if you wear them to your private salsa dance lesson or group class:

  • Long Dresses/Pants: Tripping hazard for you and your partner
  • Tight Short Dresses and Skirts: Will ride up as you dance and move around, so you'll constantly have to be pulling them down in order to avoid showing everyone your underwear
  • Polyester/Synthetic Shirts or Tops: They don't breathe and you'll get hot super fast
  • Tops/shirts with big baggy sleeves or large armholes: All of the extra fabric makes it difficult for your partner to hold on to your back and you risk of trapping your partner's hand/arm by mistake when he accidently sticks his hand in there while reaching for your back (it's happened to me before and was super awkward).
  • Shirts/Sweaters with Front Pockets: Risk of trapping/catching your partner's hand in your pocket (also happened before and hurt my partner's hand because it got caught in there while I was spinning around)
  • Partially Zipped/Buttoned Sweaters/Jackets: Baggy space in front also presents a risk for trapping/catching your partner's hand (can you see a pattern here?)
  • Baggy Pants/Jeans with Flared Bottoms: Poses a tripping hazard. It's surprisingly easy to get your foot caught in your own pant leg while you're dancing and trip or fall down (I know because it's also happened a couple of times to me).
  • Warm/wool Sweaters: They warm you up really fast when you're dancing, so make sure you're wearing something underneath so you can take off your sweater or you'll melt
  • Strapless Dresses and Tube Tops: You will constantly have to pull them up because they keep sliding down when you dance, super annoying
  • Backless Tops: Too sexy for class usually, plus your back will get all sweaty if you get really hot and your partner will have to touch it (gross)
  • Crop Tops/Bralettes: Unless it's 80 plus degrees and super hot outside/in the studio, I'm going to say that crop tops and bralettes are too sexy for class usually. And if you're single or going to class by yourself, you probably don't want random guys touching your bare waist, do you?
  • Short-Shorts/Booty Shorts/Daisy Dukes: They can ride up as you dance and give you a wedgie, (not fun), plus they're a little too sexy for class

What Types of Shoes Are Best?

Generally, women should wear shoes that are either flat or with a small heel (2 inches high or less). You want something with a smooth bottom that doesn't have a lot of grip/traction (so avoid gym shoes) or else you'll risk twisting your ankle and/or hurting your knee when you spin around.

Since you're moving and spinning around a lot, you don't want to worry about your shoes slipping off, so make sure you wear something that securely attaches to your feet.

For your first private lesson/group class, you can wear street shoes that you already own, and then down the road consider getting "real" dance shoes, especially if you'll be dancing regularly.

Some Regular Shoe Options For Women Are:

  • Dressy Sandals with Straps: Either flat or with a small wedge heel. Just no thong-style sandals because they will be too loose and you risk ripping out the thong strap.
  • High-heeled Shoes with an Ankle Strap, T-Strap or Mary Jane Strap: Make sure that they have some kind of strap(s) that keep the shoe on your foot, and avoid slingbacks or backless heels because they'll make dancing difficult. The heel should be no more than two or three inches high, or else you'll have balance problems when you spin and your feet will hurt and get tired quickly.
  • Leather Booties and Booties with a Smooth Bottom: Either flat, or with a heel of three inches or less. Just make sure they're not heavy winter boots or you'll be clunking around. Also, no UGG boots.
  • Spectator Shoes: As long as they have a smooth bottom

If you want to get "Real Dance Shoes", here are some options:

  • Dance Sneakers/Jazz Shoes: Similar to a gym shoe, but with more flexibility and a slippery bottom. Perfect for long workshops and for those with foot problems. Flat shoe.
  • Ladies Ballroom/Latin Practice Shoe: Similar to a men's dress shoe, but with a heel. Not very sexy looking, but comfortable and practical for standing for long periods of time, especially if you have problems with your feet. Heel up to two inches high.
  • Ladies Latin High Heeled Dance Shoe: More ankle support than a regular high heeled shoe, limited arch support, but very flexible sole. Securely attaches to your foot and is good for spinning around and going out dancing in. Heel up to three inches high.

Are Accessories Okay?

Jewelry and accessories are perfectly fine to wear to dance class, you just don't want to wear anything that will get in the way of your dancing.Generally, you want to avoid wearing long dangly necklaces and earrings because it's easy to get yourself or your partner caught in them, You should wear necklaces that are shorter,

Necklaces: You want to avoid wearing long dangly necklaces because it's easy to get yourself or your partner caught in them, You should wear necklaces that are shorter, that lay above your breasts. Personally, I love wearing statement necklaces because they look really nice, but don't get in the way of my dancing.

Rings: Wedding/engagement rings are fine. Flat, simple rings with small stones are ok. Avoid big or chunky rings because you can scratch yourself or partner with them, or get them snagged on your clothing.

Bracelets: Small close-fitting bracelets are ok, either on an elastic or with a snap/clip on closure. Avoid bangles because they slide around a lot and can come off when you're dancing. Watches are ok.

Earrings: Small stud earrings are ok. Wear long dangly chandelier earrings are your own risk, especially if you have longer hair, so they don't get caught in it.

Final Thoughts

Remember that you're there to learn how to dance and have fun, not to be the most fashionable or sexy person in the room. At the beginning, it is better to be a little bit more conservative with your fashion choices, so this way your clothing doesn't get in the way or give you any problems, and then over time as you get used dancing and become more familiar with what to expect, it will be easier to dress and accessorize yourself.

© 2016 Anya Brodech

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