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Haiku-a-Day Prompts and Examples for National Poetry Month, Today: Live

What Are Writing Prompts?

Writing prompts are useful tools to spark your creativity and get you writing. You can use them everyday or simply when you have writer's block. Each day, you will find a new word as a writing prompt. Today's prompt is "stunning." You can also see the previous words I've used as prompts below:

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Haiku #1

with fervor, he cries

tears that singe his forlorn face

leaving trails of ash

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Explanation of Haiku #1

“Singe” is a powerful word. When writing poetry, it is better to use a power word. Rather than using “burn,” I selected to use “singe” to illustrate the strength of the man’s depression. Depression is noted by the fact that the man is crying. “Trails of ash” indicates the depressed mood in the man, showing the color grey as a representation of the depression. The nature element of this haiku is that of human nature.

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Haiku #2

poetic pale moon

floating by the orange sun

light and dark dancing

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Explanation of Haiku #2

"Poetic" is a graceful word. When the sun and moon cross at sunrise and sunset, I envision this grace. Looking toward the sun and moon, watching day rise and night fall, is a reminder of "out with the old, in with the new." The entire movement between the great star and its nightly sidekick is a dance celebrating the new.

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Haiku #3

there’s a little boy

with a palm tree branch

thrashing it with its bough

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Explanation of Haiku #3

Child's play. That's what this haiku is about. A young boy beats a palm tree with its own branch. Here, I am giving an example of irony. The tree is basically beating itself. The boy is playing, but with aggression. The metaphor? The boy is the tree.

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Haiku #4

the moon, unaware

she admired his mystery

hid behind the clouds

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Explanation of Haiku #4

Unaware of its brilliance, the moon is shy in this haiku. This is an example of personification, meaning giving human attributes to inhuman things. I imagined a girl admiring the moon. The moon and the girl are connected, the girl wanting to see it, but the moon thinks it is not beautiful enough.

Haiku #5

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Haiku #5

moon beams fireflies

fluttering by the bare tree

swallowing the moon

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Explanation of Haiku #5

Here, the moon illuminates the fireflies, which are flying around a tree. The light and beauty of the fireflies is so outstanding that they are more beautiful than the moon. There is a kind relationship between the moon and the fireflies where the moon is giving up its light in order for the fireflies to shine.

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Haiku #6

ice burning water

miracles swim in ice castles

chaos is a friend

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Explanation of Haiku #6

The first line is simply a contrast of words. In the second line, "miracles" is personified by describing them as ice castles. And, the last line is another contrast of words and a contrast to the beginning of the haiku. The entire poem is about society's chaos, but the contrast is that it is something familiar and well-known.



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Haiku #7

stunning flamingo

mascot of the everglades

pink is perfection

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Explanation of Haiku #7

This is a very simple haiku using nature as a theme. The flamingos are a major nature attraction in the everglades. It's beauty represents the beauty of the everglades, which should be protected. The haiku was written to show how important it is to protect the everglades.

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Haiku #8

the sparrow says why

he flies round merry-go-rounds

to see horses live

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Explanation of Haiku #8

The merry-go-round represents life spinning in circles. The horses are objects that come to life with color, offering hope for a positive life. The sparrow adds the nature element to the haiku. As the sparrow flies circles around the merry-go-round, he brings life to the merry-go-round. The haiku is about life spinning in chaos, yet turning into beauty.


How to Write a Haiku

Haiku Themes

Comments

anonymous on March 09, 2020:

Flower covered brick

Decked in royalty, golden

Power behind walls

anonymous on May 03, 2018:

i would love some feedback on this-i used the "castles" prompt.

ivy covered brick

draped in purple, gold and rich

power placed on head

RTalloni on April 03, 2017:

Now, I'll always think of the dance you describe at dawn and dusk. :)

Poetic justice–

Creation's wild fall effecting

Incredible joy.

Kimbally Torres (author) from Ft. Lauderdale, FL on April 02, 2017:

I will post the prompt every day by 10am EST. Today's prompt was "melody." It's in another article.

Gina Welds Hulse from Rockledge, Florida on April 02, 2017:

Can you give us an idea of when you will post the prompt? Don't want to miss it.

Bella Allred on April 02, 2017:

This is wonderful! I love the idea, and I'm looking forward to the prompts the rest of this month!

Kimbally Torres (author) from Ft. Lauderdale, FL on April 02, 2017:

Thank you. Happy writing!

Kimbally Torres (author) from Ft. Lauderdale, FL on April 02, 2017:

Beautiful! I love the imagery. I can almost see the dry, brown fields.

Audrey Howitt from California on April 01, 2017:

This was lovely--Happy Poetry Month

RTalloni on April 01, 2017:

Singed by sunny rays,

Thirsty fields under clear skies

Long for rainy days.

Kimbally Torres (author) from Ft. Lauderdale, FL on April 01, 2017:

Hi Gina! Today's prompt is "singe." You can find the prompts at the top of the article. Thanks for your interest!

Gina Welds Hulse from Rockledge, Florida on April 01, 2017:

I'm doing a Haiku challenge this month, also. I did not see your prompt, but I will try to continue tomorrow, as I have already posted for today.

Kimbally Torres (author) from Ft. Lauderdale, FL on April 01, 2017:

Thank you, Jamie. After you write your haiku, please place it in the comments. I can't wait to see it!

Jamie Lee Hamann from Reno NV on April 01, 2017:

I love writing haiku! What a great idea for poetry month. Thank you for the prompt. Jamie