How to Write Lyric Poetry

Updated on May 11, 2016
How to Write Lyric Poetry
How to Write Lyric Poetry | Source

What is a Lyric Poem?

The old man’s eyes sparked to life beneath his wizened brow as the children gathered ‘round. With a deep and quiet voice he said, “Now listen to the tale of ‘The Unquiet Grave’…”

Lyric Poetry:

...a narrative poem that is usually set to a musical accompaniment

Here is a classic picture of one facet of the multi-faceted jewel that is Lyric Poetry. Formally, the lyric poem is recognized as beginning with the Greeks, but its true origins likely run all the way back to the earliest days of mankind when we first discovered the power of rhythm and rhyme-infused words for preserving our history and legend. By its broadest definition, lyric poetry is simply a narrative poem that is usually set to a musical accompaniment.

As such, it is no surprise that the lyric poem has developed a large number of different formal structures to serve a wide variety of purposes throughout history. Here is a brief summary of the most common lyrical poetry forms in Western Civilization (click here to see a chart detailing the various stanza arrangements, rhyme schemes and rhythmic layouts):

A
The Ode:
Greece

get directions

…formalized by the ancient Greeks, this poetry of praise has evolved into many forms across many cultures throughout the world.

B
The Ballad:
United Kingdom

get directions

…a simple poem structure that likely evolved from oral histories into the traveling songs and folk tales of medieval minstrels and troubadours.

C
The Ballade:
France

get directions

…13th century French form of lyrical poetry similar to the “ballad” but with a unique and very controlled structure.

D
The Sonnet:
Sicily, Italy

get directions

…began with the Petrarchan form in Sicily, traveling and evolving from there.

E
The Villanelle:
France

get directions

…originally a French song form that was eventually adopted into formal English poetry.

Some Classical Lyrical Poetry Forms

The Ode :

…one of the earliest forms of lyrical poetry with roots that likely go back deep into human history. The first formal appearances of the form lay with the Greeks, who always set them to music. Many odes have varied and elaborate structures, but they all are designed for praising or celebrating a particular idea, person, or place.

Ballad :

a poetry form primarily associated with England in the latter part of the middle ages up through the 19th century, though its roots go back into ancient storytelling traditions; it is a narrative poem traditionally set in regular four-line stanzas with a repeating refrain.

Ballade :

a French poetic form dating back to the 13th century (similar to the “ballad,” but not the same). It is a four-stanza narrative poem of tightly structured rhythm and rhyme, including a repeated line of refrain.

Sonnet:

a lyrical poetry form traditionally thought to have originated in the province if Sicily in Italy. In all of its forms—Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean—it is a 14-line, single-stanza poem in which the beginning lines establish a situation that is followed by a shift or response in the concluding lines.

Villanelle :

originally a flexible French form, the rigidly structured modern villanelle did not enter popular use until the 19th century, where it became a common form among English-language poets. The rhyme scheme is very specific and designed around only two rhyme sounds along with the regular repetition of two repeated refrains.

Options for Writing a Lyrical Poem

With the huge variety of lyrical poetry forms available, there are many flexible options for meeting the interests, purposes, and ability levels of any poet, novice to master. I have arranged a few possibilities below rated according to their level of complexity. Choose your form according to what sounds both manageable and appealing to you as a writer:

  • Basic Forms: …by its broadest definition, any narrative poem that could be set to music qualifies as a lyrical poem. So, if you are looking for the greatest flexibility, then just craft a story into a poem and set it to music according to whatever form suit you.
  • Moderate Complexity Forms: …working within the framework of an established poetic form creates enjoyable compositional challenges and adds legitimacy to your poem’s lyrical quality. The English “ballad” provides the most flexibility, though the “sonnet” provides a form that is also reasonable to manage, particularly if one does not worry too much about rhythmic form.
  • Deep Complexity Forms: writing a “villanelle” is an enchantingly challenging task, even for professional poets. Still, it is not unreasonable for any poet who has the patience to work through the form. Writing a “sonnet” or a “ballade” in strict form is also tricky but rewarding.

A Quick Reference Chart of Lyrical Poetry Forms

Lyrical Form
Stanzas
Lines per Stanza
Syllables & Meter
Rhyme Scheme
Notes
Ode
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Has Many Forms
Ballad
Variable
Quatrain (4)
8-6-8-6 ; all iambic
abcb, defe, ghih, etc.
Has a repeated "refrain" stanza
Ballade
4
3 Octets (8) and 1 Quatrain (4)
8 ; all iambic
ababbcbC (first 3), bcbC (last)
C is a repeated "refrain"
Petrarchan Sonnet
1
14
10 ; iambic pentameter
abbaabba/cdcdcd
Arranged as a Statement/Response
Spenserian Sonnet
1
14
10 ; iambic pentameter
ababbcbccdcdee
Arranged as a Statement/Response
Shakespearean Sonnet
1
14
10 ; iambic pentameter
ababcdcdefefgg
Arranged as a Statement/Response
Villanelle
6
5 Tercets and 1 Quatrain (4)
10 ; iambic pentameter
A1bA2/abA1/abA2/abA1/abA2/abA1A2
A1 & A2 are repeated rhyming lines

Note on Rhythm and Rhyme

  • Rhythm: Explaining how poets analyze word rhythms is too complex a discussion to be included here. In a general sense, if you just use your ear and follow the suggested syllables, it will work out well. If you would like to know more, I suggest googling the noted metrical patterns.
  • Rhyme: Contemporary poets will often use slant or half rhyme instead of full rhyme to make navigating the forms easier and more natural.


Suggestions for Writing Narrative Poetry

With your poetic form decided, it’s now time to develop your subject. At the heart of a lyrical poem is always a story. In its oldest historical forms, these stories were about great heroes, momentous events, or tragic tales of love. More modern lyrical poetry often takes on subjects that are less grandiose, sometimes revolving around stories of very common, every-day events.

Whatever the nature of your story, it still sits at the center, so building a good narrative is essential. Here are a few quick tips for writing successful stories:

  • Stories center on character and conflict: …at the heart of all great stories is a person—or group of people—who is facing a problem. The problem generates the conflict and how the character responds to this conflict defines the plot of the story. If you already have a story in mind, consciously define the central conflict hidden within it and then purposefully write around this tension. If you do not have a story in mind, then imagine a colorful character and place her into different situations. Once you find a combination that sparks interest, follow it and see where it goes.
  • Sensory detail is essential: …great poems, just like great novels, thrive on descriptions of concrete physical detail. Do not tell your reader what to think or how to feel. Instead, work to pull the thoughts and feelings out of your reader naturally by creating a rich and deep sensory experience for them that will draw them through your poem.
  • Poems thrive on unexpected twists: while this is not universally true for all poems, it is still something to keep in mind. Many great poems build up expectations in their readers only to surprise them towards the end. If you can create a poem that has this effect, then you likely have a quality piece in hand.

Quick Tips for Working with Rhyme in Poetry

Due to its musical roots, Lyrical Poetry is usually set in a regular pattern of full rhyme. While it is quite possible to write something like a lyrical poem in free verse or slant rhyme (also known as half rhyme), the traditional forms all use full rhyme. Writing full-rhyme poetry can be very tricky. Here are a few suggestions to make the process a little easier:

  • Use a rhyming dictionary: …even for writers with a very wide vocabulary, this tool comes in handy. Simply put in the word you are working with and it will give you a multitude of options to fit into your next line. This is especially valuable when writing in one of the forms that calls for a large number of rhyming words for the same sound.
  • Watch out for “forced rhymes”: …balancing the movement of idea and meaning in a poem with the need to match rhyme pattern is one of the huge challenges of writing a fixed-form poem. All too often, the poet will get stuck trying to find a rhyming word that fits what he wants to express in a line and, like the ugly step-sisters jamming their feet in a glass slipper far too small, the poet crams some words in to make it fit, sacrificing idea and feeling to maintain form. If you find these, revise to get rid of them; many poems are ruined by “forced rhymes.”
  • Be flexible: …when you’ve been rewriting a line for awhile to develop a decent rhyme match and nothing seems to work, one of the best approaches is to change the structure of the original line so a different word sound lands at the end. This opens up a whole new set of potential match words, making it far more likely you will end up with a good rhyme that serves the sense and meaning of the poem.

An Original English Ballad

In closing, here is a model poem I wrote with the ideas presented here. Using the oral history of my Mexican grandfather’s entry into the United States, I’ve crafted an English Ballad. You will note as you read it that I have exchanged the traditional full rhyme pattern for the modern technique of slant, or half, rhyme:

Echoes of my Grandfather

Ignacio, Mi Lito (My Grandfather)
Ignacio, Mi Lito (My Grandfather) | Source

He feels the sweat descend his brow
beneath a burning sun
while ‘round him anxious soldiers roam
and whisper revolution.

There at the Mexican border he sits
upon a sandwich pail
waiting to sell and earn a small sum
this boy who’s lost his father.

A piece of his soul has crumbled away
with the loss of one he loves,
but through the grief he finds the will
to live and build a home.

Mi hijo! Mi hijo! his mother cries
when he returns to her.
Taken! Taken! Your brother, my son,
is gone in darkness and rain.

The soldiers came and took him in arms
to fight for Pancho Villa!

At nine years old he knew that soon
they’d return and come for him.

A piece of his soul has crumbled away
with the loss of one he loves,
but through the grief he finds the will
to live and build a home.

The sisters, the mother and the only son
turned from the home they knew.
They walked to the north with a hope to see
a future without the war.

He feels the sweat descend his brow
beneath a burning sun,
and as he leaves the border behind
he mourns dear Mexico.

A piece of his soul has crumbled away
with the loss of one he loves,
but through the grief he finds the will
to live and build a home.

Questions & Answers

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      • profile image

        carl 

        5 months ago

        'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?

        Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

        Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

        And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

        Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

        And often in his gold complexion dimmed;

        And every fair from fair sometime declines,

        By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed.

        But thy eternal summer shall not fade,

        Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st

        Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,

        When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st

        So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

        So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.'

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        21 months ago from Colorado

        Thank you!

      • Cee-Jay Aurinko profile image

        Cee-Jay Aurinko 

        21 months ago from Cape Town, South Africa

        As a book reviewer who might stumble upon an author who wishes me to review a poetry book, I find this hub to quite useful to use as a reference tool. Thank you, wayseeker. I love the outline of all the different forms and I enjoyed your poem. Your hub is nothing less than a fun, but useful read.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        2 years ago from Colorado

        Robert,

        My thanks for adding a subtle distinction here that is somewhat muddied by this article. It is always good to continually sharpen one's clarity of understanding.

        Happy writing!

        Bert

      • Robert Levine profile image

        Robert Levine 

        2 years ago from Brookline, Massachusetts

        Narrative poetry is usually considered as a separate category from lyric poetry. While lyric poetry may contain narrative elements, it usually centers on the "exploded moment": heightened perception of an image or series of images in a moment or sequence of moments.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        2 years ago from Colorado

        Sam,

        Thank you. I love to write poetry, though I seldom have time these days.

        Happy writing!

        Bert

      • profile image

        sam 

        2 years ago

        i loved you poem

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        5 years ago from Colorado

        Shara63,

        Every writer is pleased to come across those who find value in their work. Thanks for your positive feedback. Poetry has become one of my favorite things as a writer, which is unexpected. Still, it's a wonderful way to simply sit and be with words. I sincerely hope that you find it useful.

        wayseeker

      • shara63 profile image

        Farhat 

        5 years ago from Delhi

        writing poem and understanding poetry are two different things, and your hub beautifully differentiates the two with an introduction to the basic forms and features of the classic poetry!

        thankyou Wayseeker, for sharing this wonderful knowledge with the learners like me and many others out here...thank you so much!

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Sid,

        Thanks so much for reading. I'm pleased that the introduction worked for you, and I hope that it leads to the production of many a wonderful verse! It actually has inspired me to do a bit more writing in the genre myself, too.

        Happy writing to you,

        wayseeker

      • SidKemp profile image

        Sid Kemp 

        6 years ago from Boca Raton, Florida (near Miami and Palm Beach)

        Thank you. I really appreciate these clear introductions to the core forms. I'm inspired! I may try some odes of my own.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        tnjman,

        I've a lot on my plate at just this moment, but I will definitely add this to my list and make a note to let you know when I get there. I'd be happy to share what I know.

        In the mean time, my very best to you in your writing!

        wayseeker

      • tnjman profile image

        tnjman 

        6 years ago from Nashville, Tennessee

        Well, is there any way at all you can give TIPS - by that, I mean, your Hub here is amazingly-well designed, not just from a content aspect, but from OUTSTANDING LAYOUT!

        I mean, maybe you could do a Hub, "How I created the layout for the 'How to Write Lyric Poetry' hub."

        Many of us struggle to do such layouts and I have yet to see a 'first-hand' experience of a "How-To." Thanks!

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        tnjman,

        Thanks for stopping by! I'd be happy to see you again, and I hope to keep producing things that will be of value.

        Happy writing,

        wayseeker

      • tnjman profile image

        tnjman 

        6 years ago from Nashville, Tennessee

        Thanks - definitely I will be reading you more often.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        PrairiPrincess,

        Thanks so much for reading! I'm glad you found some new ways to play with poetry--such a joy. May they work well for you, and thanks again for stopping in,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Haikutwinkle,

        I was surprised at how broad this topic was once I got into it. Enjoy the new options!

        wayseeker

      • prairieprincess profile image

        Sharilee Swaity 

        6 years ago from Canada

        Wayseeker, this is an incredible resource! I learned a lot from this. Will be sharing this and saving it for myself, to study further. I would like to try some of these forms for myself, as a new challenge. Thank you for writing such an informative, beautiful hub. You definitely deserved your hub of the day award. Great work!

      • haikutwinkle profile image

        haikutwinkle 

        6 years ago

        Dear wayseeker,

        This is a really great hub!

        Now I can try different poetry styles!

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        RTalloni,

        Thanks for stopping in to read. I have found it fascinating how each of us has family stories that are rich and compelling. It's a joy to craft them into our writing.

        Happy writing!

        wayseeker

      • RTalloni profile image

        RTalloni 

        6 years ago from the short journey

        Congratulations on your well-earned award. The work you've put into this tells me I should check out your other hubs. Thanks for sharing your Echoes of My Grandfather--the story is compelling.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Shanemartin,

        Thanks for reading!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Peggy W,

        That story of my Lito (my grandfather) is one that is dear to my heart from many years back in my life. It was very rewarding to try to craft it into a poem. Thanks for the votes, and happy writing to you!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Jeff,

        I had not thought of this as "reference material," but I suppose that is what it is. I'm so glad you enjoyed it, and many thanks for taking the time to read it!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Prasetio,

        It's a great please to have had an opportunity to create something that others find value in. I so appreciate you taking the time to read, and I hope it helps you in your own writing!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        pongogirl2,

        I'm so glad you enjoyed the poem. Thanks for taking the time to read it,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Gregorious,

        I don't know of any decent poet that thinks they're good, so you're in good company. Just remember that you are always better than you think you are. The trick is to always move toward making that next poem a little better than the last. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't, but there's always another page out there to be written!

        Thanks for reading,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        jaswinder64,

        Thanks for taking some time to spend here!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Urmilashuckl23,

        Thanks for reading!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        pstraubie48,

        I am pleased that the density of information, which overwhelmed me at times as I was composing this, seems to have worked out okay. I'm very glad people are finding it useful.

        Thanks for taking the time to read,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        StephanieBCrosby,

        Thanks for taking the time to read! I have added an add-on to my firefox called "Read Something" that allows me to bookmark any page I'm on in one click. I love it for things that I want to find my way back to quickly and easily. I don't know if that will be of any use to you, but there it is just in case.

        Thanks so much for taking the time to read the piece,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        albatros333,

        The poem here was the last thing I wrote. I was definitely nervous about it as I began, but it was great fun to work out. Dive in and go! Get some lyrics down and then publish them here so we can take a look and enjoy.

        Happy writing,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Pinto2011,

        The instructive nature of this hub is something lots of folks have noticed, and I really did not recognize as I was putting it together. I learned a great deal from the research myself, and I'm pleased others are finding it valuable.

        Thanks for reading,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Levertis,

        "...like viewing a mural..."--thank you so much for this. I am so very pleased that it moved you. This was my first run at a strictly lyrical poem, though I've written a number of poems in other styles prior to this one. I was simply very happy to discover that I did not have to use full-rhyme form as many lyrical poems do. My brain really hits a wall when I have to go there.

        Thanks for taking the time to read!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Senoritaa,

        I learned a few more details about some of these by doing this article than I knew before. As you say, always a joy to learn new forms.

        Thanks so much for stopping in,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        John,

        High praise from a man who knows writing well--thank you!

        My best to you,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Allie,

        My sincere appreciation for stopping in to read. As always, it was fun to write!

        Happy Hubbing to you!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        tammyswallow,

        I've been loving what the art program "gimp" can do with photos. I'm glad that the opening picture has helped to make the hub a good experience for my readers.

        Thanks so much for being one of them!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Mary615,

        I appreciate what you've said about my poem, though I, too, wonder about how good it actually is. All I know for sure is that the more you write them the better they become, so I'd say we both should just keep writing!

        Thanks for reading,

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        kelleyward,

        I've taken to using the anchored table of contents in most everything I publish these days--it just makes the hub so user friendly. I learned it from a hub called "Table of Contents" by Darkside, a fellow Hubber here. Look it up and I'm sure you'll find it. It's a bit of a process at first, but, after you get used to it, it goes a lot faster.

        Thanks for taking the time to read!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        tobusiness,

        Thanks so much for stopping in to read. My Lito (my grandfather) was a joy to me in many ways, and it was an honor to remember him here. I hope it pleases him wherever he may be now.

        Good luck in your poetry writing!

        wayseeker

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        6 years ago from Houston, Texas

        So very glad that this got a Hub of the Day award so that it drew my attention (and many others) to your well written hub about lyric poetry. I especially loved what you wrote with regard to your grandfather. Voted up, useful and beautiful.

      • profile image

        Jeff 

        6 years ago

        I love having reference material like this! You made this TRULY enjoyable! I shall bookmark this for life! Many thanks.

      • prasetio30 profile image

        prasetio30 

        6 years ago from malang-indonesia

        Very inspiring hub and I learn many things about poetry from this hub. My friend, you have done a great job by writing and share this information with us. Rated up and useful!

        Prasetio

      • pongogirl2 profile image

        Jasmine Pena 

        6 years ago from California, USA

        love your poem, it was wonderfully done. You sure do know how to write poems.

      • Gregorious profile image

        Gregorious 

        6 years ago

        Wonderful hub. The rhyming dictionary is a great tool. Bookmarked it. Sometimes I too get poetically inspired, but I don't think I'm any good.

      • profile image

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago

        Totally agree we indeed have very little time for things like these that delight us the most!

      • jaswinder64 profile image

        jaswinder64 

        6 years ago from Toronto, Canada.

        Congrats on Hub of the Day. All Pictures are stunning and wonderful poetry.

      • urmilashukla23 profile image

        Urmila 

        6 years ago from Rancho Cucamonga,CA, USA

        Awesome poetry. Thanks for posting it. Voted up.

        Congratulations on Hub of the day award!

      • pstraubie48 profile image

        Patricia Scott 

        6 years ago from sunny Florida

        Congratulations.

        There is so much here that I will come back to time and time again. Poetry is a delicate balance ....selecting each element carefully and thoughtfully. So glad you shared this.

      • StephanieBCrosby profile image

        Stephanie Bradberry 

        6 years ago from New Jersey

        Awesome work. I really wish we could still bookmark hubs, because I certainly would add this to the cadre of other useful, beautiful, and interesting hubs. Great work. And congratulations.

      • albatros333 profile image

        albatros333 

        6 years ago from San Diego

        Thanks for this easy to follow and well written hub. makes me want to sit down and try to put some lyrics on a page.

      • pinto2011 profile image

        Subhas 

        6 years ago from New Delhi, India

        Simply a great piece in the art of teaching and I would really like to become a pupil and learn the minutes. Really helpful.

      • Levertis Steele profile image

        Levertis Steele 

        6 years ago from Southern Clime

        How incredible that you had not "written a lyrical poem prior to putting this together"! Reading your poem was like viewing a mural from start to finish. It is simply beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

      • Senoritaa profile image

        Rinita Sen 

        6 years ago

        There is nothing more fulfilling for a poet than learning about different forms. Bookmarked, up and useful.

      • John Sarkis profile image

        John Sarkis 

        6 years ago from Los Angeles, CA

        Wayseeker, just when I think I can't be more impressed by your works, you redeem yourself...LOL This is truly awesome. And, additionally, I must not be the only who thinks so, because, this is your third HOTD win!...

        Congrats and Take care of yourself!

        John

      • alliemacb profile image

        alliemacb 

        6 years ago from Scotland

        Fabulous hub. Thoroughly deserves Hub of the Day. Love the poem - a great illustration of how to write lyric poetry.

      • tammyswallow profile image

        Tammy 

        6 years ago from North Carolina

        Everything about this hub is beautiful. Great poem! Congratulations on having the Hub of the Day. I really enjoyed reading this.

      • mary615 profile image

        Mary Hyatt 

        6 years ago from Florida

        I admire poets such as yourself who know how to write well. I would like to write poetry , and I've given it a try, but I know my limitations. I write more of the "roses are red....." variety of poems. Thanks so much for all this info. I have tried several narrative poems, but I didn't follow the rules exactly. I voted this UP, etc.etc.

      • profile image

        kelleyward 

        6 years ago

        I love how you set this up. How did you get your content list to go to the are where you placed the content? This is a great hub packed with interesting information about poetry. I'm bookmarking this one. I look forward to reading your family history pieces. Congrats on hub of the day!

      • tobusiness profile image

        Jo Alexis-Hagues 

        6 years ago from Lincolnshire, U.K

        This is very useful information for me.

        I've loved poetry for as long as I can remember, but I have only recently started writing my own stuff, Your information will be invaluable. I have bookmarked this for future reference. Thank you, I've also enjoyed reading the poem about your grandfather he must have been an amazing man.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Rebekah,

        This was wonderfully fun to research and put together. I'm so very pleased that folks are finding it to be a valuable resource. I also enjoyed writing the poem about my grandfather--enough that I think I'd like to try writing some more "family history" pieces.

        Thanks so much for stopping in!

        wayseeker

      • rebekahELLE profile image

        rebekahELLE 

        6 years ago from Tampa Bay

        WOW, you've given lyrical poetry some much deserved attention. I love the time and effort that is put into this hub. It is a wonderful resource for those interested in poetry, both reading it and writing it! I love the poem you have composed about your grandfather. Poetry is such a beautiful way to tell stories and record memorable times and people. Beautiful!

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Rosemay50,

        There are a number of people I know who find it hard not to rhyme, which I always find interesting. I resist rhyme (full rhyme, anyway) and find it very hard to write that way. I try it every once in a while because it's good for me, but the process, for me anyway, is very laborious.

        In any case, I'm very pleased you found the information valuable and thanks for stopping by and taking the time to read!

        wayseeker

      • Rosemay50 profile image

        Rosemary Sadler 

        6 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

        This is a super overview of the types of lyric poetry.

        I'm afraid I sometimes pay no attention to format. I usually write 4 line stanzas with rythm & rhyme but every so often I break out and just write without any thought of format at all.

        I must admit I find it hard not to rhyme, it was embedded in me from school days I guess. And I do enjoy the challenge. As you say rewording a line or finding a synonym to find a rhyme whilst keeping the flow and meaning is not always easy.

        You did a great job here. Thank you

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Robin,

        I find that much of my writing here has ties to my grandfather, which is interesting as I only really spent time with him up until I was about 4 1/2 and he never spoke a lick of English, and I did not speak any Spanish at that time. Still, when the subject moves you, it's easier to write.

        The Grecian Urn is certainly classic, and Keats was definitely a bit odd--an absolute master of the craft, but...odd.

        Thanks for taking time to read the poem and respond--it means a great deal.

        My best to you and your family,

        wayseeker

      • Robin profile image

        Robin Edmondson 

        6 years ago from San Francisco

        I loved your poem about your grandfather. You are quite talented, my friend. ;) This was a great overview of the different types of lyrical poetry. One of the poems I remember the most from high school was Ode on a Grecian Urn by Keats. It seemed like such an odd thing to pay homage to.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Cre8tor,

        Thanks so much for stopping in to read! I was hoping this would build some background and provide some tools for those who love poetry, but have not gone "deep" with it. I'm pleased that people are finding it useful.

        Happy Hubbing!

        wayseeker

      • Cre8tor profile image

        Dan Robbins 

        6 years ago from Ohio

        This is great. I love to write poems but never understood really the differences between styles. Thank you for educating me.

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Suzy,

        I had not thought that this would pull up such memories, but I'm glad it did! I have my own of such deep discussions...to bad there's so little time for such things once you enter "true" adult life. Oh well.

        Thanks for reading!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        LVidoni5,

        Thanks so much for stopping in! I was aiming this for folks just like you, so I'm glad to hear that you found it useful. There are many wonderful forms to work with...enjoy them.

        Happy writing!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        Simone,

        Always a pleasure to have you drop by! Putting this together was rather challenging as I had not actually written a lyrical poem prior to putting this together. There was a lot of information to pull together in a small space. I'm pleased to hear that it seems to have worked.

        Happy Hubbing!

        wayseeker

      • wayseeker profile imageAUTHOR

        wayseeker 

        6 years ago from Colorado

        mljdgulley354,

        I appreciate the positive feedback. I'm very pleased you found it useful! Happy writing,

        wayseeker

      • suzy-Moon profile image

        suzy-Moon 

        6 years ago from nj

        A very useful note, refreshes the memories of college days, when we sat for days debating on the subject of my favorite Shakespearean sonnet "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day" . As for our debates I guess that it has already been established that they were written for a male.

      • LVidoni5 profile image

        Brian Loewer 

        6 years ago from Portland, Oregon

        Great hub! This is really helpful for someone like me, who likes to write poetry, but isn't familiar with the different forms and what it takes to create them. Nice, I'll have to use this as a reference in the future. Up n' stuff.

      • Simone Smith profile image

        Simone Haruko Smith 

        6 years ago from San Francisco

        My goodness! Reading this makes me wish I had devoted more of my school years to studying poetry. Guess I'll just have to embark on that journey now!

        This was a fantastic overview- I really enjoyed reading about each type of lyrical poem's origins, and the table showing their different formats is so useful. I'd totally like to have a crack at making one of my own someday. Though I might need to start a bit simpler... perhaps with a haiku, hehee!

      • mljdgulley354 profile image

        mljdgulley354 

        6 years ago

        Am printing this hub. Great information and your poem is wonderful. Thank you for sharing it.

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